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4.

5.

Anal groove distinct, extending
anteriorly around anus. Scutum
without eyes, festoons, or orna-
mentation. d8 with seven shields
adhering to and almost entirely
covering ventral surface. (Rare
in the Sudan).......................................DoDES

Figures 212 to 25

Anal groove distinct or indistinct
but never extending anteriorly around
anus. Cö with fewer (2 to 6) or no
ventral shields, these partially non-
adherent and only circumanal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Without eyes. (Basis capituli rec-
tangular dorsally)....................................... 3

With eyes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Palpi narrow, elongate; segment 2 at
least twice as long as wide. (Rep-
tile parasites)...................................APONOMMA

Figures 95 to IC3

Palpi conical, short; segment 2 about
twice as wide as long. (Mammal or
bird parasites)..............................HAEMAPHYSALIS

Figures.TXTST57 Palpi as wide as or wider than long. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Palpi longer than wide (Common,
usually large ticks).....................................8

Large ticks with colored ornamentation.

Basis capituli rectangular dorsally.

(Rare in Sudan, parasites of elephant

and rhinoceros)................................DERMACENTOR Figures I2OTECT27

Small or moderated-sized, unornamented,
common ticks. Basis capituli usually
hexagonal dorsally......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
6. Anal grooves faint or obsolete.
Festoons absent. Spiracular plates
round or oval. d5 very small---------------------------7

Anal grooves distinct. Festoons
present. Spiracular plates with
a tail-like protrusion. d6'

moderate size............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RHDPICEPHADUS Figures 2.0 to 315

7. Palpi ridged dorsally and lateral-
ly. & with normal legs. (Common
chiefly on domestic cattle and

equines)........................................B00PHIII's Figures 1U to TT9

Palpi not ridged and somewhat more

elongate. d8 with massive, beady

leg segments. (Rare in Sudan, known

only from giraffes)............................MaFGAROPUS Figures 255-5-235

8. Scutum without colored ornamentation.
dö, with adanal and subanal shields.
Palpal segment 2 at least twice as
long as segment 3. Festoons ir-
regular, partially coalesced.....................HYALOMMA
Figures 158 to 2TI

Scutum with colored ornamentation*.
dö without adanal or subanal shields.
Palpal segment 2 less than twice as
long as segment 3. Festoons regular,

not coalesced. -----------------------------...--AMBLICMMA

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*Ornamentation is often not extensive in the elephant tick, A.

tholloni. Ornamentation may be more or less faded in poorly preserved specimens.

KEY TO DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES

With scutum. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Family Ixodidae

Without scutum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Family Argasidae

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Family Argasidae

Six legs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Larvae

Eight legs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Genital aperture undeveloped; in
large nymphs may be indicated by
a small, otherwise undifferentiated

depression. -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Nymphs

Genital aperture clearly developed
a.S 8. differentiated area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adults

Family Ixodidae

Six legs. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Larvae

Eight legs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Genital aperture undeveloped. Scutum
of Q type but basis capituli lacking
porose areas. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Nymphs

Genital aperture developed. Scutum
of d or Q type and basis capituli of

Q with two porose areas (Figure 6 }...................Adults

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On the following pages all available EQUATORIA PROVINCE RECORDS for each species are listed according to numbers of specimens of each stage and sex, locality within the Province, host, and month of collection. The mammalian hosts are described by Setzer (1956B) in his "Mammals of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan". Domestic animals and wild birds or reptiles are listed following wild mammals. Where human beings have served as hosts, the records precede those from animals. Different collections from one kind of host are listed geographically from east to west.

If two or more collections have been made from a single kind of host in the same locality during one month, the data have been collated on one line and the number of collections noted in parentheses immediately following the month. The "number of collections" are statistically unreliable since they may refer to one day's collection or to a collection from one herd of domestic animals. However, every collection from a single wild animal host is considered as a single collection.

It will be noted that most specimens were taken during the dry season, November to April. This has no significance except to indicate that much of my tick collecting in Equatoria Province was accomplished during this season. Most Sudan material presented by other persons has also been gathered during this period when travel is easier and most officials have returned from home leave.

The great bulk of records in the Equatoria Province section are from my collection and are not otherwise noted. Any data from other sources are indicated by initials in parentheses following the month of collection: (SVS) for Sudan Veterinary Service, (SGC) for Sudan Government Collections, (BMNH) for British Museum (Natural History), or (CNHM) for Chicago Natural History Museum collections. Since King's (1926) review, only two literature references for ticks from definite localities in Equatoria Province have been published and these have been noted, following the month of collection, in the usual literature reference manner.

Most Equatoria Province collecting localities may be located in Figure 317. Common names of hosts may be found in Chapter W. The situation of a few of King's early collecting localities cannot now be definitely ascertained, but they are all close to the present Uganda border.

Reasons for special reference to Equatoria Province are several. My Sudan collection is largely from this Province, and it is from here that most of the new data presented in this report have been obtained. Also, Equatoria Province represents the northern limits of a number of truly tropical African species. Of these, a few undoubtedly range into Bahr El Ghazal and Upper Nile Provinces, though they are not yet recorded from these areas.

Ticks now known from the Sudan number 62 identifiable species plus two additional subspecies. Of this total of 64 identifiable forms, 52 occur in Equatoria Province. Twenty-five are presently recorded only from Equatoria Province and five are known only from Bahr El Ghazal Province. Two uncertain forms are also listed.

DISTRIBUTION IN THE SUDAN

Under DISTRIBUTION IN SUDAN all known collecting localities have been listed for each species by Province, with the exception of course, of Equatoria Province, which is separately considered. Besides my own collections, the chief source of this information has been the collections of the Sudan Government, for which H. H. King, R. Cottam, W. Ruttledge, D. J. Lewis, and a few other persons have been largely responsible.

Specimens submitted to me for identification by the Sudan Weterinary Service have been important for data on species parasitizing domestic animals. British Museum (Natural History) collections have contributed additional information for areas outside of Eduatoria Province. Almost no other Sudan data have appeared in literature, except for a few papers by King, one or two by Ruttledge, and brief notes by Balfour and a few other persons.

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