Page images
PDF
EPUB

IXODES RASUS

ARTHUR (1956 correspondence). Preliminary study of a large amount of material referrable to this name reveals that five species with closed circular or pointed anal grooves are involved. Incidentally, Neumann's type material, from hyrax has pointed anal grooves. Rio Muni specimens especially are easily distinguishable from all others. Neumann's material from Togo (Berlin Museum), now at Toulouse, is I. oldi, although Neumann had identified it as I. rasus. What Nuttall considered as I. rasus is a new species" that is now being described. Schulze's descriptions of the I. rasus group are very vague and it is difficult to associate his so-called subspecies with available material. I. rasus and related species are no more variable than other Ixodes species and are easily separated once adequate criteria have been established.

N.B. The exact status of the pair of specimens illustrated herein (Figures 222 to 225) and of the single male from the Sudan (page 550) has not yet been determined.

IXODES SCHILLINGSI

TENDEIRO (1955). Mozambique. Review of previous reports from colony.

Figures 342 to 346, d, 347 to 351, 9; 352 to 358, nymph.
Figures 342, 347, and 352, legs I to IV.
Figures 343, 344, 348, 349, 353, and 354, palpi, dorsal
and ventral views.
Figures 345, 350, and 355, hypostome, ventral view.
Figures 346, 35l, and 356, spiracular plates.
Figures 357 and 358, nymph, dorsal and ventral views.

MARGAROPUS REIDI SP. NOV. an Paratypes

- 896

[graphic]

Figures 359 and 360, c, dorsal and ventral views Figures 361 and 362, Q, dorsal and ventral views

MARGAROPUS WINTHEMI

South African Specimens from Dr. G. Theiler

PLATE CII

[graphic]

Figures 363 to 367, d. Figure 363, tarsi I to IV.
Figures 364 to 365, palpi, dorsal and ventral views.
Figure 366, hypostome, ventral view.
Figure 367, spiracular plate.

Figures 368 to 372, Q. Figure 368, tarsi I to IV.
Figures 368 and 370, palpi, dorsal and ventral views.
Figure 371, hypostome, ventral view.
Figure 372, spiracular plate.

MARGAROPUS WINTHEMI South African Specimens from Dr. G. Theiler

PLATE CIII

[graphic]

MARGAROPUS WINTHEMI Karsch, 1879(B).
(Figures 359 to 372)
THE WINTER HORSE TICK Or

THE SOUTH AFRICAN BEADY-LEGGED TICK

NOTE: This non-Sudanese species is treated herein in order to provide comparative data for M. reidi sp. nov. and because it is necessary to modify our concepts of the genus Margaropus. Data concerning this tick have not been reviewed in # since Donitz (1910B).

DISTRIBUTION

The winter horse tick occurs only in localized areas of the Union of South Africa and Basutoland. This species has been introduced into Southern Rhodesia and Madagascar but populations do not appear to have become established. Frequent literature references to this as a South American tick are incorrect.

Z.SOUTHERN AFRICA: UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA: Specimen stated to have originated from "Valparaiso", Winthem legit; no further data; assumed (HH) to be South Africa: Karsch 9B). Type specimen examined and stated to be misformed M. microplus: Neumann (1901); refuted by Dönitz (1907B). Without species £) Orpen (1904). As Rhipicephalus species # Lounsbury (1905). As M. lounsburyi: Neumann (1907B, 1911). As Rhipicephalus phthirioides sp. nov.: Cooper and Robinson (#. As M. Winthemi: "Donitz (1907B,191OB). As M. lounsburyi: Howard (1903). As M. winthemi: Bedford # 1932B, 1934). Jack (1921, 1923, 1937). Cowdry (1935C,iščić2%). du Toit (1942B, 1947A). Theiler and Salisbury (1956). BASUTOLAND: Howard (1908). Bedford (1920, 1926, 1927, 1932B). Theiler and Salisbury (1956).7

[graphic]

ZT SOUTHERN RHODESIA: Introduced from South Africa but not known to be established in Southern Rhodesia: Jack (1921, 1928,

« PreviousContinue »