A Wild Sheep Chase

Front Cover
Hamish Hamilton, 1990 - Japanese fiction - 299 pages
A marvelous hybrid of mythology and mystery, "A Wild Sheep Chase" is the extraordinary literary thriller that launched Haruki Murakami's international reputation. A lonely 20-something young man begins a surreal quest in which he confronts not only a herd of mythological sheep but also the demons deep within himself.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Aug3Zimm - LibraryThing

Intellectually interested but not emotionally engaging. One thing I really enjoy about Murakami is how he portrays a sense of disconnectedness between people. That feeling was more prevalent in the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CharlotteBurt - LibraryThing

As you would expect from Murakami this is a strange tale, but a good read nonetheless. All about the search for a specific sheep with a star on its back. This has everything you would expect with a ... Read full review

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About the author (1990)

Author Haruki Murakami was born on January 12, 1949 in Kyoto, Japan, and most of his youth was spent in Kobe. Murakami's parents both taught Japanese literature. Murakami studied at Tokyo's Waseda University. He opened a coffeehouse/jazz bar in the capital called Peter Cat with his wife, Yoko. He later turned to writing full time following the publication of his first novel in 1979, Hear the Wind Sing. Murakami received national recognition for Norwegian Wood and is considered by many to be an important figure in postmodern literature. His fiction is described as humorous and surreal, and the themes of alienation and loneliness are often present in his works. Several of his stories have been adapted for the stage and as films. Murakami has also written nonfiction, including works dealing with the Aum Shinrikyo subway gas attack, as well as a collection of essays about his marathon and triathlon experiences, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running. He has translated into Japanese literature written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Carver, Truman Capote, John Irving, and Paul Theroux. Murakami has received numerous literary awards, including the Franz Kafka Prize for his novel Kafka on the Shore and the Yomiuri Prize for The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. In January 2009 Murakami received the Jerusalem Prize.

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