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And yet, in mine opinion, he had least reason of the three to be discouraged: for that although it was judged, and judged by the highest kind of judgment, in form of a statute or law, that he should be banished, and his whole estate confiscated and seized, and his houses pulled down, and that it should be highly penal for any man to propound a repeal ; yet his case even then had no great blot of ignominy; for it was thought but a tempest of popularity which overthrew him. Demosthenes contrariwise, though his case was foul, being condemned for bribery, and not simple bribery, but bribery in the nature of treason and disloyalty, yet nevertheless took so little knowledge of his fortune, as during his banishment he did much busy himself, and intermeddle with matters of state ; and took upon him to counsel the state, as if he had been still at the helm, by letters; as appears by some epistles of his which are extant. Seneca indeed, who was condemned for many corruptions and crimes, and banished into a solitary island, kept a mean; and though his pen did not freeze, yet he abstained from intruding into matters of business; but spent his time in writing books of excellent argument and use for all ages; though he might have made better choice, sometimes, of his dedications.

These examples confirmed me much in a resolution, whereunto I was otherwise inclined, to spend my time wholly in writing; and to put forth that poor talent, or half talent, or what it is, that God hath given me, not as heretofore to particular ex

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changes, but to banks, or mounts of perpetuity, which will not break. Therefore having not long since set forth a part of my Instauration ; which is the work, that in mine own judgment, “ si nunquam fallit imago," I do most esteem ; I think to proceed in some new parts thereof. And although I have received from many parts beyond the seas, testimonies touching that work, such as beyond which I could not expect at the first in so abstruse an argument; yet nevertheless I have just cause to doubt, that it flies too high over men's heads : I have a purpose therefore, though I break, the order of time, to draw it down to the sense, by some patterns of a Natural Story and Inquisition. And again, for that my book of Advancement of Learning may be some preparative, or key, for the better opening of the Instauration ; because it exhibits a mixture of new conceits and old; whereas the Instauration gives the new unmixed, otherwise than with some little aspersion of the old for taste's sake; I have thought good to procure a translation of that book into the general language, not without great and ample additions, and enrichment thereof, especially in the second book, which handleth the partition of sciences; in such sort, as I hold it may serve in lieu of the first part of the Instauration, and acquit my promise in that part. Again, because I cannot altogether desert the civil person that I have borne; which if I should forget, enough would remember ; I have also entered into a work touching Laws, propounding a character of justice in a middle term,

between the speculative and reverend discourses philosophers, and the writings of lawyers, which ar tied and obnoxious to their particular laws. An although it be true, that I had a purpose to make particular digest, or recompilement of the laws o mine own nation; yet because it is a work of assist ance, and that which I cannot master by mine own forces and pen, I have laid it aside.

I have laid it aside. Now having in the work of my Instauration had in contemplation the general good of men in their very being, and the dowries of nature ; and in my work of laws, the general good of men likewise in society, and the dowries of government; I thought in duty I owed somewhat unto my own country, which I ever loved; insomuch as although my place hath been far above my desert, yet my thoughts and cares concerning the good thereof were beyond, and over, and above my place : so now being, as I am, no more able to do my country service, it remained unto me to do it honour: which I have endeavoured to do in my work of The reign of King Henry the seventh. As for my Essays, and some other particulars of that nature, I count them but as the recreations of my other studies, and in that sort purpose to continue them; though I am not ignorant that those kind of writings would, with less pains and embracement, perhaps, yield more lustre and reputation to my name than those other which I have in hand. But I account the use that a man should seek of the publishing of his own writings before his death, to be but

changes, but to banks, or mounts of perpetuity, which will not break. Therefore having not long since set forth a part of my Instauration ; which is the work, that in mine own judgment, " si nunquam fallit imago," I do most esteem ; I think to proceed in some new parts thereof. And although I have received from many parts beyond the seas, testimonies touching that work, such as beyond which I could not expect at the first in so abstruse an argument; yet nevertheless I have just cause to doubt, that it flies too high over men's heads : I have a purpose therefore, though I break, the order of time, to draw it down to the sense, by some patterns of a Natural Story and Inquisition. And again, for that my book of Advancement of Learning may be some preparative, or key, for the better opening of the Instauration ; because it exhibits a mixture of new conceits and old; whereas the Instauration gives the new unmixed, otherwise than with some little aspersion of the old for taste's sake; I have thought good to procure a translation of that book into the general language, not without great and ample additions, and enrichment thereof, especially in the second book, which handleth the partition of sciences; in such sort, as I hold it may serve in lieu of the first part of the Instauration, and acquit my promise in that part. Again, because I cannot altogether desert the civil person that I have borne ; which if I should forget, enough would remember; I have also entered into a work touching Laws, propounding a character of justice in a middle term,

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THERE met at Paris, in the house of Eupolis, *Eusebius, Zebedæus, Gamaliel, Martius, all persons of eminent quality, but of several dispositions. Eupolis himself was also present; and while they were set in conference, Pollio came in to them from court; and as soon as he saw them, after his witty and pleasant manner, he said,

Pollio. Here be four of you, I think, were able to make a good world; for you are as differing as the four elements, and yet you are friends. As for Eupolis, because he is temperate, and without passion, he may be the fifth essence.

Eupolis. If we five, Pollio, make the great world, you alone make the little; because you profess, and practise both, to refer all things to yourself. Pollio. And what do they that practise it, and profess it not ? Eupolis. They are the less hardy, and the more dangerous. But come and sit down * Characters of the persons.

Eusebius beareth the character of a moderate divine : Gamaliel of a protestant zealot : Zebedæus of a Roman catholic zealot : Martius of a military man : Eupolis of a politic: Pollio of a courtier.

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