Guide to obtaining an army school certificate, 1st class, by an army schoolmaster [G. L. Dunnett].

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Page 6 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast, Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge. And in the visitation of the winds, Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deaf ning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes...
Page 5 - How many thousand of my poorest subjects Are at this hour asleep ! O sleep, O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eye-lids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness ? Why rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs, Upon uneasy pallets stretching thee, And hush'd with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber ; Than in the perfum'd chambers of the great, Under the canopies of costly state, And lull'd with sounds of sweetest melody?
Page 4 - What good to his country or himself might not a trader or merchant have done with such useful though ordinary qualifications ? Will. Wimble's is the case of many a younger brother of a great family, who had rather see their children starve like gentlemen, than thrive in a trade or profession that is beneath their quality.
Page 84 - In every triangle, the square on the side subtending an acute angle, is less than the squares on the sides containing that angle, by twice the rectangle contained by either of these sides, and the straight line intercepted between the perpendicular let fall on it from the opposite angle, and the acute angle.
Page 6 - Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads and hanging them With deafening clamour in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes ? Canst thou, O partial sleep, give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude, And in the calmest and most stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a king ? Then happy low, lie down I Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Page 4 - Persians burn on the mountains: it flames night and day, and is immortal, and not to be quenched ! Upon something it must act and feed — upon the pure spirit of knowledge, or upon the foul dregs of polluting passions.
Page 5 - There is a glorious city in the sea; The sea is in the broad, the narrow streets, Ebbing and flowing; and the salt seaweed Clings to the marble of her palaces. No track of men, no footsteps to and fro, Lead to her gates! The path lies o'er the sea, Invisible: and from the land we went, As to a floating city — steering in, And gliding up her streets, as in a dream...
Page 83 - If there be two straight lines, one of which is divided into any number of parts, the rectangle contained by the two straight lines is equal to the rectangles contained by the undivided line, and the several parts of the divided line. Let...
Page 4 - I say, in conducting your understanding, love knowledge with a great love, with a vehement love, with, a love coeval with life, what do I say but love innocence ; love virtue...
Page 34 - If 5 men can perform a piece of work in 12 days of 10 hours each, how many men will perform a piece of work four times as large in a fifth part of the time, if they work the same number of hours in the day, supposing that 2 of the second set can do as much work in an hour as 3 of the first set?

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