Visions of Victory: The Hopes of Eight World War II Leaders

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 11, 2005 - History - 292 pages
Visions of Victory, first published in 2005, explores the views of eight leaders of the major powers of World War II - Hitler, Mussolini, Tojo, Chiang Kai-shek, Stalin, Churchill, de Gaulle, and Roosevelt. He compares their visions of the future in the event of victory. While the leaders primarily focused on fighting and winning the war, their decisions were often shaped by their aspirations for the future. What emerges is a startling picture of postwar worlds. After exterminating the Jews, Hitler intended for all Slavs to die so Germans could inhabit Eastern Europe. Mussolini and Hitler wanted extensive colonies in Africa. Churchill hoped for the re-emergence of British and French empires. De Gaulle wanted to annex the northwest corner of Italy. Stalin wanted to control Eastern Europe. Roosevelt's vision included establishing the United Nations. Weinberg's comparison of the individual portraits of the war-time leaders is a highly original and compelling study of history that might have been.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Adolf Hitler
5
Benito Mussolini
39
Tojo Hideki
57
Chiang Kaishek
77
Josef Stalin
95
Winston Churchill
135
Charles de Gaulle
161
Franklin D Roosevelt
175
The Real Postwar World
211
Notes
235
Bibliography
267
Index
285
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Gerhard L. Weinberg is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is the author of numerous books and articles on the origins and course of World War II, including A World At Arms: A Global History of World War II (Cambridge University Press, 1994), which won the George Louis Beer Prize of the American Historical Association, and Germany, Hitler, and World War II (Cambridge University Press, 1995).

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