Some Memoirs of the Amours and Intrigues of a Certain Irish Dean: Who Liv'd and Flourish'd in the Kingdom of Ireland, Not Many Hundred Years Since. Interspers'd with the Gallantries of Two Berk-shire Ladies. In which Will be Inserted Several Original Letters of the Said Dean, that Will be Well Known by Those that May be Now Living, who Have Ever Seen the Dean's Hand-writing

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Printed, and Dublin Reprinted by R. Dickson, 1730 - 96 pages
 

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Page 89 - Friends, who are ready to venture their Lives at my command, I fometimes fpend an Hour or two moft cheerfully with them. The time appointed for this Meeting, and the ordinary meafure of my Stay with them, agreed fo well with my Appointment with you, that I could...
Page 35 - Svveetnefs in her Eyes ; threw out the Bait with all her Artifice, not that fhe either lov'd him or any other Man : He too frequently convers'd with Ladies of her Difpofition, to be fo eafily caught ; and if that had not been the Cafe...
Page 82 - How to find it out he could not tell ; he watch'd her continually, had her dog'g'd wherever (lie went, tried the old Device of going Journies into the Country ; yet all would not do : He parted Beds, and deny'd himfelf a Joy he was as much tranfported with as Leonora, to bring her to his Lure : He...
Page 80 - Bafenefs in it, which made him contemptible when he affected to be popular ; his Companions were fuch as had been excluded all other Society, very much below him in Rank, and Underftanding ; the Dregs of the Degree of Gentlemen, and for the generality Sharpers, ta whom he lent his Name, always taking care to part with nothing elfe.
Page 81 - Strepbon ; and met her with as much Warmth as a Man could, whofe Intereft was his predominant Paflion : He had however fuch a refcrve for his Friend, that he would not take her from him without he confented.
Page 88 - Face, and fo disordered her Hair, that was thruft up under a Peruke, That the long Trails of it falling down as fhe made her Bows...
Page 79 - Ventures to to po/Tefs her ; for fhe was not of equal Birth, and could by no way pretend to be his Wife ; for he was known to have renounced all Thoughts of Marriage, and...
Page 80 - Ventures to poflcfc her j for fhe was not of equal Birth, and could by no way pretend to be his Wife; for he was known to have renounced all Thoughts of Marriage, and profefs'd to be as free in his Love as he was in his Religion, in which he was by no means tooftrid.

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