Deadly Sounds, Deadly Places: Contemporary Aboriginal Music in Australia

Front Cover
UNSW Press, 2004 - History - 296 pages
This is the first comprehensive book on contemporary Aboriginal music in Australia. The names of many well-known Aboriginal artists are scattered through the book’s pages, including such household names as Ernie Bridge, Kev Carmody, Troy Cassar-Daley, Coloured Stone, Jimmy Little, Archie Roach, the Warumpi Band and, of course, Yothu Yindi. The book includes a Discography of the artists featured in the book.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
11
Abbreviations
13
Introduction
15
What is contemporary Aboriginal music?
16
Geographies of contemporary Aboriginal music
19
Situating musical knowledges
21
Audiences and aesthetics
24
Music and country
26
Covering songs changing meanings
106
Prison songs
108
The Tamworth Country Music Festival
112
Conclusion
116
4 Aboriginality Aboriginality and transnational black culture hiphop and RB
119
Black transnationalism
120
Comin at ya hiphop projects from the bush
126
Rhythm n bounce Aboriginal
130

Terminology
27
Structure of the book
31
Origins institutions industries
35
Music hall vaudeville and gum leaves
38
Evangelical sounds and the influence of missions
40
A new mobility
43
Reggae and rock in the 1970s and 1980s
47
Contemporary music in the era of selfdetermination
50
A national geography
56
Recording companies and the music industry
58
A Music place and identity
67
Music and the Aboriginal significance of place
69
Naming practices among Aboriginal music groups
74
Aboriginalisation and music
75
Gender and identity
84
Conclusion music and community
91
A Singing country
95
NonAboriginal country music in Australia
96
Aboriginal country music
99
Aboriginal country music performers
103
Conclusion
132
A Sites as songs place in the music
135
Warumpinya links to tradition
142
Conclusion after Warumpinya
150
Contemporary music and Aboriginal languages
157
Conclusion negotiating cultural and economic identities
168
Tourism and music in Alice Springs
182
Conclusion
189
Yothu Yindi
198
Conclusion
208
Nitmiluk place and postcolonialism
211
Nitmilukas map of Jawoyn country
220
Conclusion
227
Mining at Noonkanbah
236
Conclusion
244
The homeland movement
252
Conclusion beyond Mabo
259
References
269
Index
290
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