The Female Spectator

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T. Gardner, 1755
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Page 289 - Ye mountains of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither let there be rain, upon you, nor fields of offerings : for there the shield of the mighty is vilely cast away, the shield of Saul, as though he had not been anointed with oil.
Page 260 - And know'st thou not, no law is made for love? Law is to things which to free choice relate; Love is not in our choice, but in our fate ; Laws are but positive; love's power, we see, Is Nature's sanction, and her first decree.
Page 107 - ... happen of ourselves to like or dislike, we, for the most part, continue to applaud or condemn to our life's end. — So difficult is it to eradicate, in age, those sentiments imbibed in our youth. It is this fatal propensity, which binds, as it were, our reason in chains, and will not suffer it to look abroad, or exert any of its powers ; hence are our conceptions bounded ; — our notions meanly narrow ; — our ideas, for the most part, unjust ; — and our judgment shamefully led astray. The...
Page 232 - Believe me, royal youth, thy fruit must be Or gather'd ripe, or rot upon the tree. Heaven has to all allotted, soon or late, Some lucky revolution of their fate: Whose motions, if we watch and guide with skill, (For human good depends on human will,) Our fortune rolls as from a smooth descent, And from the first impression takes the bent: But if, unseized, she glides away like wind, And leaves repenting folly far behind.
Page 293 - ... choice, not want of wit; Whose foppery, without the help of sense, Could ne'er have rose to such an excellence. Nature's as lame in making a true fop As a philosopher; the very top And dignity of folly we attain By studious search and labour of the brain, By observation, counsel and deep thought: God never made a coxcomb worth a groat. We owe that name to industry and arts : An eminent fool must be a fool of parts.
Page 261 - Tis dangerous too cunningly to feign. The Play at last a Truth does grow, And Custom into Nature go. By this curst art of begging I became Lame, with counterfeiting Lame. 5My Lines of amorous desire I wrote to kindle and blow others...
Page 111 - ... truly worthy of an ardency of love or ambition, and that vice alone ought to be held in abhorrence. THIS would be a laudable prejudice ! — A prejudice which would go hand in hand with reafon, and fecure to us that peace and happinefs which sill ether prejudices are fure to deftroy.
Page 219 - Must be, when those misfortunes shall arrive; And since the man who is not feels not woe (For death exempts him, and wards off the blow, Which we, the living, only feel and bear) What is there left for us in death to fear? When once that pause of life has come between, 'Tis just the same as we had never been.
Page 310 - Of Fortune, Fate, or Providence complain ? God gives us what he knows our wants require...
Page 267 - Children like tender osiers take the bow, And as they first are fashion'd, always grow, For what we learn in youth, to that alone In age, we are by second nature, prone.

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