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Gentle as her I lost.
Then for his sake I'll willingly endure
The present misery. Omy Ronniero!
Wilt thou not trust my conduct for a day?-
Absent all night! To what a state of passion
His brooding fancy must have work'd his mind!

Alas, alas ! 'tis his infirmity. While Zorada is in this pitying and to bring out the secret from the forgiving mood, Romiero enters her Nurse—and the worthy old woman, apartment, and craves pardon on doing her best to baffle all enquibis knees. She wonders to hear him ries, happens to allude to a son of speak of “fears” and“ discoveries ;" hers who, when an infant,“ with fair and is at first alarmed lest he may Zorada played like a brother.” have found out Sebastian. But when

Rom. (looking upon her). he alludes, in unintelligible terms, to Vile wretch, thou liest ; but thou shalt the concerted elopement of Maurice

tell the truth. and Beatrice, she is utterly lost in I'll press the breath from out thy cursed amazement, and says,

body, “ Thy words are wild, I do not comprehend

Unless thou tell me where thy son is hid ! them."

Nurse. My son, my lord !

Rom. Ay, witch; I say thy son ; Thrown off his guard, he narrates the The ugliest bound the sun e'er looked story, and tells her how glad a sight upon. it was to him to find it was but- Tell me, and instantly, if thou wouldst Beatrice.

breathe Zorada is indignant, but grants Another moment. Tell me instantly." pardon, and the Nurse re-enters, Here he shakes her violently, busily arranging her basket, and then

wbile Guzman interposes, and Rolooking up, starts on seeing Romie- miero struggling with him, falls to ro. He puts his hand into the bas- the ground,

and Nurse escapes off the ket, and is puzzled and perplexed to stage. On the ground he lies, curfind it full of delicate viands- sing the Nurse's sonand, concealed beneath leaves-a picture of Zorada. The Nurse “This hateful, vulgar, shapeless creature prevaricates-and Romiero's mad. Fy-Fy!” ness comes back on him in fearful whom he believes in his insanity to force and he now knows that Zo. rada is criminal. Soon after he says

be the paramour of Zorada ! to Guzman,

“ Not please her! Every thing will " I'll tell thee more

please a woman

Who is bereft of virtue, gross, debased. When I have breath to speak.

Yea, black deformity will be to her My dame, my wife, she whom I made

A new and zestful object.” Hath secret mysteries-hath a beldame It was here intended to picture

the meanest, most abject, unnatural, Hath one concealed to whom she sends and worse than brutish, state of the O shame!

passion, and it is done; but is the Outrageous, frontless shame! the very object legitimate? Does it come picture

within the limits of tragedy, wide Which I bave gazed upon a thousand as they are in nature and in Shaktimes,

speare? Zorada enters—says a few Tears in my eyes, and blessings on my words—is accused of shameless sin lips.

and wringing her hands, disapHow little thought I once-vain, vain

pears from the presence of her infuremembrance !

riated husband. It is a thing most strange if she be ho.

But poor Zorada's visits to the nest !”

Abbey have raised suspicions of her With the assistance of his ever- virtue, even in the minds of her ready friend, Guzman, Romiero, faithful domestics. And here comes in his uttermost abasement, resolves the catastrophe :

my wife,

nurse

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SCENE III.

An old Gothic Chapel : SEBASTIAN and ZORADA are discovered in earnest conversation.

Seb. And wilt thou bear these lessons in thy mind ?

Zor. I shall forget to say my daily prayers
When I forget to think of thee, dear father!
And when I think of thee, thy words of kindness,
And words of counsel too, shall be remember'd.

Seb. Sweet child ! stand back and let me look upon thee.
Ay ; so she look'd. 0! it is sweet in thee
To look so like thy mother, when mine eyes
Must take their last impression, as a treasure
Here (his hand on his heart) to be celld for ever. Many looks
Thy varying face was wont to wear, yet never,
But in some sad or pensive mood, assumed
The likeness of that countenance ;—to me
Thy loveliest look ; though, to all other eyes,
Thy mother's beauty never equall'd thine.

Zor. I still remember her; the sweetest face
That e'er I look'd upon. I oft recall it,
And strive to trace the features more distinctly.

Seb. Be good as she was; and when I am gone,
Never again let myst'ry and concealment,
Tempting the weakness of thy husband's nature,
Which but for this were noble, break the peace
And harmony of marriage. For this oath-
This fatal oath-he was constrain'd to take it.
Then so consider it, por let it rankle
Within thy gentle breast : that were perverse.
When I am gone, all will again be well,
And I will write to thee and comfort thee.
Our minds shall still hold intercourse, dear Zada,
And that should satisfy.
Zor.

Alas! alas !
When I shall read thy letters, my poor heart
Will but the more yearn after thee, dear father !
And pine to see thee. Suffer me to hope
That we shall meet again. Call it not vain,
But suffer me to think-

Enter Nurse in alarm.

What is the matter?
Nurse. You are discover'd : Don Romiero comes ;
I heard his voice approaching through the trees.
I heard the hollow tread of many feet.

Zor. (to SEBASTIAN). O fly! farewell !
Seb.

Farewell, my dearest child !
Heaven bless and guard thee ever ! O farewell!

[Embraces her, and exit.
Zor. If he should be discovered!
Nurse.

Fear it not.
He knows the nearest path, and on the beach
The Captain will receive him. Ere 'tis light,
He will be safely in the vessel lodged.
O all good saints of heaven! he's here already.

Enter ROMERO.
Rom. Most wretched and degraded woman! Now
Thy shameful secret is discover'd. Now,
Vice unveil'd and detestable must have
Its dreadful recompense. Where is thy minion ?

Zor. O cease! you frighten me with such fierce looks.
I have done thee no wrong.

Rom. Provoke me not with oft-repeated words,
Which I do know are false as his who fell

Apostate and accursed. Where is thy minion ?
(In a still louder voice and stamping on the ground.)
Tell me without delay : speak briefly, truly,
If thou hast hope to live another hour.

Zor. O pity, pity! be not so enraged !
Thou shalt be told the truth a few hours hence ;
Then, to that time, detest me as thou wilt,

But spare my life.
Re-enter SEBASTIAN, while ROMIERO has, in his rage, atrode to the front of the stage.

ZORADA, uttering a shriek, runs to her father, and throws her veil over his face, endearouring to push him back.

Seb. What! fly and leave thee in a madman's power ? I heard his stormy voice, and could not leave thee. (Romiero turns round, and, running furiously at them, stabs Zorada in aiming at

SEBASTIAN, Guzman, who enters in alarm, followed by Maurice and Beatrice, endeavouring, in vain, to prevent him).

Guz. Hold! hold! thou wilt not strike a covered foe!

Zor. (still clinging round her father). Strike me again ; I will not quit my hold.
I'll cling to him; within my dying grasp
I'll hold him safe : thou wilt not kill him there.

(Sinking to the ground, while the veil drops from the face of SEBASTIAN.)
Rom. Her father !
Zor.

Yes ; my father, dear Romiero !
Thou wilt not slay us both. Let one suffice.
Thou lovedst me once ; I know thou lovest me now:
Shall blood so dear to thee be shed in vain ?
Let it redeem my father !-I am faint,
Else I would kneel to thee.

(Endeavouring to kneel, but prevented and supported by Nurse and BEATRICE.)
Nurse. Do not, dear murder'd child !
Bea. My dear, dear friend, forbear. He heeds thee not.
Guz. Romiero, dost thou hear her sad request ?

Rom. I hear your voices murm’ring in mine ear
Confused and dismal. Words I comprehend not.
What have I done ? Some dreadful thing, I fear.
It is delusion this ! she is not slain :
Some horrible delusion.

Zor. (aside to SEBASTIAN). Fly, fly, dear father, while he is so wild.
He will not know and will not follow thee.

Seb. No, dearest child I let death come when it will,
I'll now receive it thankfully. Romiero,
Thou wretched murd'rer of thy spotless wife
Romiero de Cardona !
Rom. Who is it calls me with that bitter voice ?

(Gazing on him ; and then with a violent gesture of despair). I know thee ;-yes, I know what I have done.

Guz. Forbear such wild and frantic sorrow now,
And speak to her while she is sensible,
And can receive thy words. She looks on thee,
And looks imploringly.

Rom. Zorada, my Zorada ! spotless saint !
I loved thee far beyond all earthly things,
But demons have been dealing with my soul,
And I have been thy tyrant and thy butcher,
A wretch bereft of reason.

Bea. She makes a sign as if she fain would speak,
But her parch'd tongue refuses. (To Maurice). Fetch some water
To moisten those dear lips and cool that brow.

[Exit MAURICE.
She strives again to speak.
Rom. (stooping over her). What wouldst thou say? What means that gentle

motion ?
Zor. Come close to me; thou'rt pardon'd, Love, thou'rt pardon'd.

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Rom. No, say that I am blasted, ruin'd, cursed, Hateful to God and man.

Re-enter MAURICE with water, which she tastes. Zor. Thou art not cursed; O no! then be more calm.

(Endeavouring to raise herself up). Look here : he is my father : think of that. Thou'rt pardon'd, Love; thou’rt pardon'd.

[Dies. Rom. She call'd me Love. Did she not call me so ? Guz. Yes, most endearingly. Rom. And she is gone, and I have murder'd her! (Throws himself on the body, and moaning piteously; then starts up in despair,

and looks furiously at Sebastian.)
Thou restless, selfish, proud, rebellious spirit !
Thy pride has work'd our ruin, been our bane ;
The bane of love so bless'd! Draw, wretched man,
I've sworn an oath, which I will sacred hold,
That when Sebastian and myself should meet,
He should to royal justice be deliver’d,
Or, failing that, one of the twain should die.

(Drawing his sword fiercely upon him). Guz. (holding him back). Hold, madman, hold! thy rage is cruel, monstrous, Outraging holy nature.

Rom. (breaking from him). Off! think'st thou to restrain or bind despair
With petty strength like thine ?-Proud rebel, draw.
I am thy daughter's murderer, and thou
Destroyer of us both.

Seb. Yes, Don Romiero, we are match'd in ruin,
And we will fight for that which cures despair.
He who shall gain it is the conqueror.

(They fight, each exposing himself rather than attacking his adversary.)
Rom. No; to't in earnest, if thou would'st not have me
Deliver thee a felon to the law.
Defend thine honour, though thou scorn thy life.

(They fight again, and Romero falls.) I thank thee, brave Sebastian : O forgive Harsh words that were but meant to urge contention. Thou’rt brave and noble ; so my heart still deem'd thee, Though, by hard fate, compellid to be thy foe. Come hither, Guzman : thou hast sworn no oath. Give me thy hand; preserve Sebastian's life, And lay me in the grave with my Zorada.

[The Curtain drops.

Printed by Ballantyne and Company, Paul's Work, Edinburgh.

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE

No. CCXLV.

MARCH, 1836.

VOL. XXXIX.

Contents.

281

296

313

.

335

350

Swan's Select VIEWS OF THE LAKES OF SCOTLAND,
Paris MORNINGS ON TAE LEFT BANK OF THE SEINE,
WILLIAM Pitt. No. IX.
EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNALS OF AN ALPINE TRAVELLER. No. II.
A WORD FOR WINTER. BY The Sketcher,
HINTS TO AUTHORS. No. V. How to Be PhilosoPHIC. No. VI. ON

THE HISTORICAL,
Job PIPPINS ; The Man who“ COULDN'T HELP IT,"
BALLADS FROM THE GERMAN OF LUDWIG UALAND,
ALCIBIADES THE Boy,
FANNY FAIRFIELD. Part II.
TRANSLATIONS FROM THE GREEK ANTHOLOGY. BY WILLIAM HAY,
The Cotton MANUFACTURE,

357

370

.

381

384

391

404

407

EDINBURGH: WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS, no. 45, GEORGE STREET,

EDINBURGH ;

AND T. CADELL, STRAND, LONDON.

To whom Communications (post paid) may be addressed.
SOLD ALSO BY ALL THB BOOKSELLERS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM.

PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND CO. EDINBURGH.

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