'Twixt land and sea

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Doubleday, Page, 1924
 

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Page 99 - Yes. I've been in the water practically since nine o'clock. The. question for me now is whether I am to let go this ladder and go on swimming till I sink from exhaustion, or — to come on board here.
Page 103 - ... fierce story to make an old judge and a respectable jury sit up a bit. The first thing I heard when I came to myself was the maddening howling of that endless gale, and on that the voice of the old man. He was hanging on to my bunk, staring into my face out of his sou'wester. " 'Mr. Leggatt, you have killed a man. You can act no longer as chief mate of this ship.
Page 93 - I felt most was my being a stranger to the ship; and if all the truth must be told, I was somewhat of a stranger to myself.
Page 104 - Not much," he assented, sleepily, in his hoarse voice, with just enough deference, no more, and barely suppressing a yawn. "Well, that's all you have to look out for. You have got your orders.
Page 105 - I inquired, in the hardly audible murmurs we used, after he had told me something more of the proceedings on board the Sephora once the bad weather was over. "When we sighted Java Head I had had time to think all those matters out several times over. I had six weeks of doing nothing else, and with only an hour or so every evening for a tramp on the quarter-deck.
Page 143 - ... command. Walking to the taffrail, I was in time to make out, on the very edge of a darkness thrown by a towering black mass like the very gateway of Erebus — yes, I was in time to catch an evanescent glimpse of my white hat left behind to mark the spot where the secret sharer of my cabin and of my thoughts, as though he were my second self, had lowered himself into the water to take his punishment : a free man, a proud swimmer striking out for a new destiny.
Page 115 - I hesitated. Should I whisper something to him? But what? His immobility seemed to have been never disturbed. What could I tell him he did not know already? . . . Finally I went on deck.
Page 106 - I'd go about at night strangling people. Am I a murdering brute? Do I look it? By Jove! If I had been he wouldn't have trusted himself like that into my room. You'll say I might have chucked him aside and bolted out, there and then—it was dark already.
Page 107 - ... dogmatic sort of loafer who hated me like poison, just because I was the chief mate. No chief mate ever made more than one voyage in the Sephora, you know. Those two old chaps ran the ship. Devil only knows what the skipper wasn't afraid of (all his nerve went to pieces altogether in that hellish spell of bad weather we had)— of what the law would do to him— of his wife, perhaps.
Page 110 - Your ladder—" he murmured, after a silence. "Who'd have thought of finding a ladder hanging over at night in a ship anchored out here! I felt just then a very unpleasant faintness. After the life I've been leading for nine weeks, anybody would have got out of condition. I wasn't capable of swimming round as far as your rudderchains. And, lo and behold! there was a ladder to get hold of. After I gripped it I said to myself, "What's the good?' When I saw a man's head looking over I thought I would...

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