Fire in the Blood: The Epic Tale of Frank Gardiner and Australia's Other Bushrangers

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Allen & Unwin, 2005 - Fiction - 328 pages
A ripping yarn about bush ranging in Australia in the 19th century told through the eyes of the quintessential Australian bushranger, Frank Gardiner--the only one who wasn't killed by gunshot or hanging.
 

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Contents

The boy from Boro
15
A mothers hate
29
A mate indeed
42
Black and white
55
Rough justice
71
Blood on the Wattle
91
Shot in the heart
104
Prince of the road
121
Farewell to my lovely
205
All fall down
213
Dancing the twostep
221
The last goodbye
228
Freedom?
234
Galloping for Glory
243
Kelly come lately
245
Go east young man
253

The big strike
127
Potty by name
136
North and south
143
Cops and robbers
159
Trapped
166
Trials and tribulations
176
Two verdicts
190
In durance vile
198
Darkie
261
A welllaid plan
274
The faro kid
279
Sweet Felina
286
Gallop for glory
291
The end and the beginning
300
Epilogue
304
Copyright

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Page 76 - During the five days permitted for preparation, they manifested extraordinary fervour of repentance. The morning came, they received on their knees the sentence as the will of God. Loosened from their chains, they fell down in the dust, and, in the warmth of their gratitude, kissed...
Page 152 - When at length these were completed and the bolt was drawn, there ensued one of the most appalling spectacles ever witnessed at an execution. The noose of the rope, instead of passing tightly round the neck, slipped completely away, the knot coming round in front of the face, while the whole weight of the criminal's body was sustained by the thick muscles of the poll. The rope, in short, went round the middle of the head, and the work of the hangman proved a most terrible bungle. The sufferings...
Page 152 - ... rope, instead of passing tightly round the neck, slipped completely away, the knot coming round in front of the face, while the whole weight of the criminal's body was sustained by the thick muscles of the poll. The rope, in short, went round the middle of the head, and the work of the hangman proved a most terrible bungle. The sufferings and struggles of the wretched being were heartrending to behold. His body swayed about, and writhed, evidently in the most intense agony. The arms repeatedly...
Page 125 - The following is a copy of the letter: — (To the Editor of the "Burrangong Miner," Lambing Flat.) Sir, — Having seen a paragraph in one of the papers, wherein it is said that I took the boots off a man's feet, and that I also took the last few shillings that another man had, I wish to make it known that I did not do anything of the kind. The man who took the boots was in my company, and for so doing I discharged him the following day. Silver I never took from a man yet, and the shot that was...
Page 77 - ... violation is resorted to. To resist, can hardly be expected in a situation so utterly removed from, and lamentably destitute of, protection. A terrorism is sternly and resolutely maintained to revenge not merely exposure, but even...
Page 76 - Their sunken glazed eyes, deadly pale faces, hollow fleshless cheeks and once manly limbs shrivelled and withered up as if by premature old age, created horror among those in court. There was not one of the six who had not undergone, from time to time, a thousand lashes each and more. They looked less like human beings than the shadows of gnomes who had risen from their sepulchral abode. What man was or ever could be reclaimed under such a system as this?
Page 80 - I have drunk from my sixteenth year —ten long years—and the sweetest draught is that which takes away the misery of living death; it is the friend that deceives no man; all will then be quiet—no tyrant will there disturb my repose, I hope, William Westwood.
Page 126 - ... each shanty along the road, to put a stop to the depredations done on the road. I certainly think that it would be a great acquisition to me for I should then have an increase of revolvers and carbines. When seven or eight men could do nothing with me at the Pinnacle, one would look well at a shanty. Three of your troopers were at a house the other night and got drinking and gambling till all hours. I came there towards morning when all was silent. The first room I went into I found revolvers...
Page 227 - And yet these bushrangers, the scum of the earth, the lowest of the low, the most wicked of the wicked, are occasionally held up for our admiriation! But better days are coming. It is the old leaven of convictism not yet worked out, but brighter days are coming.
Page 223 - The sentence of the Court is that you be taken hence to the place from which you came, and from thence to a place of execution, there to be hanged from the neck until you are dead.

About the author (2005)

Robert Macklin is a journalist for the Diplomat and has co-authored three books with Peter Thompson--The Man Who Died Twice, The Battle of Brisbane, and Kill the Tiger.

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