On Divine Foreknowledge: Part IV of the Concordia

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Cornell University Press, 2004 - Philosophy - 286 pages

Luis de Molina was a leading figure in the remarkable sixteenth-century revival of Scholasticism on the Iberian peninsula. Molina is best known for his innovative theory of middle knowledge. Alfred J. Freddoso's extensive introductory essay clears up common misconceptions about Molina's theory, defends it against both philosophical and theological objections, and makes it accessible to contemporary readers.

 

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Contents

Foreknowledge and Providence
1
Contingency and Freedom
9
Alternatives to Molinism
29
The Theory of Middle Knowledge
46
Objections and Replies
62
Liberi Arbitrii cum Gratiae Donis Divina Praescientia Providentia
83
Whether All the Things That Exist Have
98
Whether Future Contingents Are Known
111
Whether It Is through the Ideas That
130
Whether Freedom of Choice and
145
Whether in God There Is Knowledge
164
On Predeterminations and where
196
Bibliography
275
Index of Names
281
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About the author (2004)

Alfred J. Freddoso is John and Jean Oesterle Professor of Thomistic Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame. He is the editor and translator of many books, most recently On Efficient Causality: Metaphysical Disputations 17, 18, and 19 by Francisco Suarez.

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