The Horticultural Register, Volume 2

Front Cover
J. Paxton, 1833 - Horticulture
 

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Page 354 - Scarcely any painter's art can so happily imitate the beauty of a fine female complexion ; still less could any artificial colour upon the face itself bear a comparison with this lovely blossom.
Page 354 - As I contemplated it I could not help thinking of Andromeda as described by the poets ; and the more I meditated upon their descriptions, the more applicable they seemed to the little plant before me; so that, if these writers had had it in view, they could scarcely have contrived a more apposite fable.
Page 106 - ... seen in the cucumber and melon grounds in the vicinity of very populous cities in Europe, or in Asia, so large an expanse of plant in a state equally healthy...
Page 236 - Standing by, however, some time in silence, he suddenly saw it open an eye. He then took it up— its head fell — its legs hung loose — it appeared again totally dead.
Page 53 - ... roots have struck into the rope, and are giving their assistance in support of the branch. After a similar period the...
Page 106 - ... torn off from the bottom and carried in the boat to the platform, where the weeds are twisted into conical mounds, about two feet in diameter at their base, and of the same height, terminating at the...
Page 44 - With these exceptions, every frosty winter has been followed by a cold summer. The true cause of cold, or rather the direct cause, is to be found in the winter excess of west wind, every winter with excess of west wind being followed by a cold summer; and if there is no cold before, or during a first excess, then a second excess of west wind in winter occasions a still colder summer than the first. It also appears, by repeated experience, that cold does not extend to more than two years at a time....
Page 41 - ... so great, as to show that the unfortunate victim had fought long and manfully. On pursuing his track it appeared that the wolves had pursued him for a considerable distance ; he had often turned upon them and driven them back. Several times they had attacked him, and been repelled, as appeared by the blood and tracks. He had killed some of them, before the final onset, and in the last conflict had destroyed several. His axe was his only weapon.
Page 20 - ... to resent the aggression, or to enter the room. Having placed the straw upon the charcoal, and holding the dish close 'to the mouth of the hive, he blew the smoke strongly against the combs, but removed the straw the instant it took fire, to prevent it burning the bees, and quenched the flame before he employed it again. Almost stifled by the smoke, the bees hurried through the outer door with such...
Page 422 - To the inner part of each of these valves the seeds are attached, and remain so for some time after the valves, in the process of ripening, have separated and stood open. The influence of the sun's heat, however, causes the sides of each valve to shrink and collapse, and in this state the edges press firmly upon the seed, which, from being before apparently irregular in its arrangement, comes into a straight line. The seeds, it may be remarked...

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