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" What is one great reason that tobacco should not be used ? to her acquaintance this filthy weed ; for those who use it are daily losing that saliva which ought to be saved for the mastication of their food. 48. Man has only one stomach, and this is all... "
Familiar Lessons on Physiology: Designed for the Use of Children and Youth ... - Page 15
by Lydia Folger Fowler - 1848
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The Philosophy of Natural History

William Smellie - Anamals - 1832 - 327 pages
...opposite sides of the organ, and, being moved by muscles belonging to them, they grind up thoroughly the food passed between them, which then goes out at the orifice into the intestines. The animals of this class reside for the most part in the water. A few are found...
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Familiar Lessons on Physiology: Designed for the Use of Children and Youth ...

Lydia Folger Fowler - Physiology - 1850 - 95 pages
...this filthy weed ; for those who use it are daily losing that saliva which ought to be saved for the mastication of their food. 48. Man has only one stomach,...it is sent into the second, which is arranged like "ittle cells, having little divisions or partitions between them. 50. Here the food is divided into...
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Familiar Lessons on Physiology: Designed for the Use of Children and Youth ...

Lydia Folger Fowler - 1851
...this filthy weed ; for those who use it are daily losing that saliva which ought to be saved for the mastication of their food. 48. Man has only one stomach,...it is sent into the second, which is arranged like kittle cells, having little divisions or partitions between them. 50. Here the food is divided into...
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The Philosophy of Natural History

William Smellie - Animal behavior - 1851 - 360 pages
...opposite sides of the organ, and, being moved by muscles belonging to them, they grind up thoroughly the food passed between them, which then goes out at the orifice into the intestines The animals of this class reside, for the most part, in the water. A few are found...
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The Philosophy of Natural History: Prepared on the Plan, and Retaining ...

John Ware - 1863
...are placed upon opposite sides, and, being moved by muscles belonging to them, thoroughly grind up the food passed between them, .which then goes out at the orifice into the intestines. These animals .reside, for the most part, in the water. A few are found upon land....
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