The History of Jemmy and Jenny Jessamy ...

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T. Gardner, 1753 - Courtship - 158 pages
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Page 230 - Man is but man; unconstant still, and various ; There's no to-morrow in him, like to-day. Perhaps the atoms rolling in his brain Make him think honestly this present hour; The next, a swarm of base, ungrateful thoughts May mount aloft...
Page 118 - Not the f:lver dov*s that fly, Yok'd in Cytherea's car; Not the wings that lift fo high ; And convey her fon fo far ; Are fo lovely, fweet, and fair, Or do more ennoble love ; Are fo choicely match'da pair, Or with more confent do nun e.
Page 204 - Thus much of this, will make black, white ; foul, fair ; Wrong, right ; bafe, noble ; old, young; coward, valiant.
Page 208 - Tis dangerous too cunningly to feign. The Play at last a Truth does grow, And Custom into Nature go. By this curst art of begging I became Lame, with counterfeiting Lame. 5My Lines of amorous desire I wrote to kindle and blow others...
Page 38 - twere to break the laws herfelf has made i Our fubftances themfelves do fleet and fade ; The moft fix'd being ftill does move and fly, Swift as the wings of time 'tis meafur'd by. T' imagine then that Love fhould never ceafe (Love, which is but the ornament of thefe) Were quite as fenfelefs, as to wonder why Beauty and colour ftays not when we die. NOT FAIR. * F~Ti 1 S very true, I thought you once as fair -*• As women In th...
Page 285 - Sex wou'd not in vain, Of broken Vows and faithlefs Men complain. Of all the various Wretches Love has made, How few have been by Men of...
Page 2 - Children,*' like tender oziers, take the bow, And as they firft are fafhon'd, ftill will grow.
Page 56 - I have often had occasion to make the same reflections; — it follows then, that every one before they engage in marriage should be well vers'd in all those things, •whatever they are, which constitute the happiness of it; — this town is an ample school, and both of us have acquaintance enough in it to learn, from the mistakes of others, how to regulate our own conduct and passions, so as not to be laugh'd at ourselves for what we laugh at in them.
Page 285 - Did you but think how feldom fools are juft, So many of your fex would not in vain Of broken vows, and faithlefs men complain...

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