Murray's English Exercises ...: Revised, Prepared, and Particularly Adapted to the Use of Schools; Being a Counterpart to the English Teacher

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R.S. Davis, 1850
 

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Page 39 - And nightly to the list'ning earth Repeats the story of her birth : Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Page 192 - The wicked flee when no man pursueth : but the righteous are bold as a lion.
Page 38 - Who wickedly is wise, or madly brave, Is but the more a fool, the more a knave. Who noble ends by noble means obtains, Or failing, smiles in exile or in chains, Like good Aurelius let him reign, or bleed Like Socrates, that man is great indeed. What's fame? a fancied life in others' breath, A thing beyond us, ev'n before our death.
Page 251 - And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said: Cry aloud, for he is a god; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is on a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth and must be awaked.
Page 39 - What nothing earthly gives, or can destroy, The soul's calm sunshine, and the heart-felt joy, Is virtue's prize: A better would you fix?
Page 247 - Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity! It is like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard: that went down to the skirts of his garments; As the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that descended upon the mountains of Zion: for there the Lord commanded the blessing, even life for evermore.
Page 39 - The spacious firmament on high, With all the blue ethereal sky, And spangled heavens, a shining frame, Their great original proclaim : Th' unwearied sun, from day to day, Does his Creator's power display, And publishes to every land The work of an Almighty hand.
Page 213 - We came to our journey's end, at last, with no small difficulty, after much fatigue, through deep roads, and bad weather.
Page 38 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 40 - What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball; What though no real voice nor sound Amid their radiant orbs be found; In reason's ear they all rejoice, And utter forth a glorious voice, For ever singing as they shine, The hand that made us is divine.

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