Digital Diversions: Youth Culture in the Age of Multimedia

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Julian Sefton-Green
Psychology Press, 1998 - Art - 179 pages
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Recent years have seen a proliferation of speculation about the impact of new digital technologies in virtually all areas of society. The fields of entertainment, leisure, media and communications, work, education and culture are all undergoing radical transformation, and technological change is clearly a vital feature of these transformations. Young people are central to the debate in a number of ways - as privileged users of new cultural and entertainment forms, as uncritical consumers, and as the future citizenry of the new digital age but also as objects of anxiety. This work explores the diverse ways in which young people are active social agents in the production of youth culture in the digital age. It collects an international range of empirical accounts describing the ways in which young people utilize and appropriate new technology. The contributors draw on a range of theoretical perspectives including cultural studies, social anthropology and feminism.
 

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Contents

Introduction Being Young in the Digital Age
1
Fun and Games are Serious Business
21
Blue Group Boys Play Incredible Machine Girls Play hopscotch Social Discourse and Gendered Play at the Computer
43
Digital Visions Childrens Creative Uses of Multimedia Technologies
62
Making Connections Young People and the Internet
84
An American otaku or a boys virtual life on the Net
106
Digital Culture the View from the Dance Floor
128
Hackers Masters of Modernity and Modern Technology
149
Notes on Contributors
172
Index
174
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About the author (1998)

Julian Sefton-Green is a Principal Research Fellow in the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science, University of London.

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