Maximizing the Security and Development Benefits from the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention

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Malcolm R. Dando, Cyril Klement, MARIAN NEGUT, G.S. Pearson
Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 31, 2002 - Science - 416 pages
The Editors would like to thank the authors of the papers at the Advanced Research Workshops for their excellent presentations at the workshops and the production of their drafts. We are indebted to those who helped in the preparation of this volume. We should particularly like to acknowledge the help of Piers Millett, who compiled the papers, set them into camera-ready format and produced the index and Dr. Simon Whitby who made the final changes to the manuscript. Any remaining errors are, of course, our responsibility. Malcolm R. Dando Cyril Klement Marian Negut Graham S. Pearson IX ACHIEVING SECURITY BENEFITS FROM TECHNICAL COOPERATION UNDER THE BIOLOGICAL AND TOXIN WEAPONS CONVENTION GRAHAM S. PEARSON Visiting Professor of International Security, Department of Peace Studies, University of Bradford, Bradford, West Yorkshire BD7 IDP, UK 1. Background l The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention which opened for signature in 1972 2 and entered into force in 1975 currently has 144 States Parties and 18 Signatory States Article I of the Convention is all-embracing in its complete prohibition of biological weapons stating that: Each State Party to this Convention undertakes never in any circumstances to develop, produce, stockpile or otherwise acquire or retain: (1) Microbial or other biological agents, or toxins whatever their origin or method of production, of types and in quantities that have no justification for prophylactic, protective or other peaceful purposes; (2) Weapons, equipment or means of delivery designed to use such

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Contents

Achieving Security Benefits from Technical Cooperation under the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention
1
OUTBREAKS OF DISEASE
27
Reporting Outbreaks of Human Diseases
29
Reporting Outbreaks of Animal Diseases
41
Reporting Outbreaks of Plant Diseases
53
South American Realities Problems and Perspectives
63
Current European Reporting
97
Surveillance and Monitoring of Infectious Disease in the Slovak Republic
121
The Experience of the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology
209
Benefits from International Cooperation in Biosafety in Central and Eastern Europe
221
Measures to Provide Biosafety at the Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology Vector
247
Biotechnology Transfer under BTWC Protocol and the Convention on Biological Diversity
253
The US Select Agent and Laboratory Registration Program
259
The Development of Biotechnology in Poland
273
The Development of Microbiology and Biotechnology in the Czech Republic During the Past 20 Years and Prospects for the Future
277
Prospects of the SRC VB Vector International Collaboration in the Field of Emerging Infections and Biotechnology
287

Investigations of Outbreaks of Disease Under Protocol to the Biological Weapons Convention
125
Investigations of Suspicious Outbreaks
139
An Overview
143
Immunological Techniques A Comparison
149
An Unusual Outbreak of West Nile Fever in Romania
161
WHO Contribution to Global Surveillance of Microbial Threats
167
INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
177
Maximizing the Security Benefits from International Cooperation in Microbiology and Biotechnology
179
Infrastructure Regulations And Procedures
189
An Overview
199
Good Manufacturing Practice and Licensed Products
295
Approaches to the Introduction of the Quality System into the SRC VB Vector
303
Industrial Aspects of Technical CoOperation in Microbiology and Biotechnology
309
Databases Networks and Clearing Houses
319
The OPCW Experience
343
Building Peaceful CoOperation into the BTWC Verification Protocol
351
CONCLUDING REMARKS
361
Maximizing the Security Benefits from Technical Cooperation Under the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention
363
Index
403
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