What's Wrong with the Liberal Party?

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 7, 2003 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 168 pages
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The fortunes of the Australian Liberal Party have rarely been higher, yet times remain uncertain for the party, and questions about its future remain: How much more division about its economic and social direction can it sustain? What changes has it made to stop the Democrats and One Nation from stealing its voters? How can a party associated with the 'big end' of town hope to keep the trust of the 'battlers'? How is the old dogma of the party coping with the new challenges of globalization and terrorism? Why are liberals so obsessed with Paul Keating? Greg Barns is a former liberal, and the only member of the apart from Pauline Hanson to be disendorsed by the party before an election. Drawing upon his insider's knowledge and his outsider's freedom to consider the issues objectively, Greg Barns exposes the major challenges facing the party today.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Walking Down the Middle of the Road
8
A Liberal Party Obsession
25
Whither the Nationals?
41
Assuming One Nation
52
The Paradox
69
After Howard?
84
Meeting the Challenges Have the Liberals Been Captured?
104
So Where To from Here?
118
Conclusion
140
Endnotes
145
Bibliography
152
Index
160
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Greg Barns was disendorsed by the Liberal Party in February 2002 over his criticism of the Howard government's policy towards asylum-seekers. He was chair of the Australian Republican Movement and chief of staff to federal finance minister John Fahey. He is a columnist for the Hobart Mercury, and a regular contributor to the Age, the Australian and the Sydney Morning Herald. He is now a member of the Australian Democrats.

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