Heroes of maritime discovery; or, Chapters in the history of ocean adventure and enterprise, Page 68

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Page 166 - As who pursued with yell and blow Still treads the shadow of his foe, And forward bends his head, The ship drove fast, loud roared the blast, And southward aye we fled. And now there came both mist and snow, And it grew wondrous cold ; And ice, mast-high, came floating by, As green as emerald.
Page 166 - At length did cross an Albatross : Through the fog it came ; As if it had been a Christian soul, We hailed it in God's name. It ate the food it ne'er had eat, And round and round it flew. The ice did split with a thunder-fit ; The helmsman steered us through ! And a good south wind sprung up behind ; The Albatross did follow, And every day, for food or play, Came to the mariners...
Page 127 - I go (For all my mind is clouded with a doubt) — To the island-valley of Avilion ; Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow. Nor ever wind blows loudly ; but it lies Deep-meadowed, happy, fair with orchard lawns And bowery hollows crown'd with summer sea, Where I will heal me of my grievous wound.
Page 113 - The inhabitants of this country are the miserablest people in the world. The Hodmadods of Monomatapa, though a nasty people yet for wealth are gentlemen to these, who have no houses and skin garments, sheep, poultry, and fruits of the earth, ostrich eggs etc. as the Hodmadods have; and setting aside their human shape, they differ but little from brutes.
Page 31 - General at this place and time, thinking himself both in respect of his private injuries received from the Spaniards, as also of their contempts and indignities offered to our country and Prince in general, sufficiently satisfied, and revenged...
Page 24 - ... thirty-two years old, of middle height, with crisp brown hair, a broad high forehead ; grey steady eyes, unusually long ; small ears, tight to the head ; the mouth and chin slightly concealed by the moustache and beard, but hard, inflexible and fierce. His dress, as he appears in his portrait, is a loose dark seaman's shirt, belted at the waist. About his neck is a plaited cord with a ring attached to it, in which, as if the attitude was familiar, one of his fingers is slung, displaying a small,...
Page 21 - Doughty (as he then in the presence of us all sacredly protested) was great, yet the care he had of the state of the voyage, of the expectation of her...
Page 126 - ... flesh, by which many of them became so tame, that they would lie about him in hundreds, and soon delivered him from the rats. He likewise tamed some kids; and, to divert himself, would, now and then, sing and dance with them, and his cats: So that by the...
Page 45 - Without presumption so deserv'da name, By knowledge once, and transformation now) In her new shape, this sacred port allow. Drake and his ship could not have wish'd from Fate A more blest station, or more blest estate ; For, lo ! a seat of endless rest is given To her in Oxford, and to him in heaven.
Page 87 - Esperanca ; in which voyage, I have either discovered or brought certain intelligence of all the rich places of the world, which were ever discovered by any Christian.

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