The Management of Insects in Recreation and Tourism

Front Cover
Raynald Harvey Lemelin
Cambridge University Press, Nov 22, 2012 - Science
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Insects such as cockroaches, mosquitoes and bed-bugs are usually not highly sought amongst travellers or recreationists, yet each year, collectors, butterfly enthusiasts, dragonfly-hunters and apiarists collect, visit, document and raise insects for recreational purposes. Illustrating a range of human-insect encounters from an interdisciplinary perspective, this book provides the first insight into the booming industry of insect recreation. Case studies and examples demonstrate the appeal of insects, ranging from the captivating beauty of butterflies to the curious fascination of locust swarms, and challenge the notion that animals lacking anthropomorphic features hold little or no interest for humans. Throughout the book, the emphasis is on the innovators, the educators, the dedicated researchers and activists who, through collaboration across fields ranging from entomology to sociology and anthropology, have brought insects from the recreational fringes to the forefront of many conservation and leisure initiatives.
 

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Contents

Part I
14
lessons in natural history conservation
56
A is for apiculture B is for bee C is for colonycollapse disorder
76
The entomological and recreational aspects
95
their lives our lives from ponds to reserves
108
becoming English fly fishers
123
An appreciation for the natural world through collecting
138
butterfly gardens
153
celebrating and fostering humaninsect
198
technology
235
Citizen science and insect conservation
252
the cultural
274
creating tolerance for some of
289
Discovering the microwilderness in parks
306
Conclusion
323
Index
338

The role of edible insects in human recreation and tourism
169
Butterfly conservatories butterfly ranches
189

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About the author (2012)

Raynald Harvey Lemelin is an associate professor in the School of Outdoor Recreation, Parks and Tourism at Lakehead University, Canada. His research interests focus around human-animal dynamics, originally in the context of polar bear viewing and more recently in examining the human dimensions of insect conservation.