The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Attila

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Michael Maas
Cambridge University Press, 2015 - History - 495 pages
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This book examines the age of Attila, roughly the fifth century CE, an era in which western Eurasia experienced significant geopolitical and cultural changes. The Roman Empire collapsed in western Europe, replaced by new "barbarian" kingdoms, but it continued in Christian Byzantine guise in the eastern Mediterranean. New states and peoples changed the face of northern Europe, while in Iran, the Sasanian Empire developed new theories of power and government. At the same time, the great Eurasian steppe became a permanent presence in the European world. This book treats Attila, the notorious king of the Huns, as both an agent of change and a symbol of the wreck of the old world order.
 

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Contents

An Overview of
3
Government and Mechanisms of Control
26
Urban and Rural Economies in the Age of Attila
44
Elites
61
Big Cities and the Dynamics of the Mediterranean
80
Dynasty and Aristocracy in the Fifth Century
98
Military Developments in the Fifth Century
125
Law and Legal Culture in the Age of Attila
140
Migrations Ethnic Groups and State Building
247
Kingdoms of North Africa
264
The Sasanian Empire
282
Religious and Cultural
301
Religious Doctrine and Ecclesiastical Change in
327
The Evidence
344
Mediterranean Jews in a Christianizing Empire
358
Ordering Intellectual Life
376

Romanness in the Age of Attila
156
Attila and the World around
173
Attilas Empire
193
The Huns and Barbarian Europe
209
Captivity among the Barbarians and Its Impact
230
Real and Imagined Geography
394
Selected Ancient Sources
414
Bibliography
425
Index
469
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About the author (2015)

Michael Maas is Professor of History and Classical Studies at Rice University, Houston. The focus of his research is late antiquity. His publications include The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Justinian (Cambridge, 2005), Exegesis and Empire in the Early Byzantine Mediterranean (by Mohr Siebeck, translated by Michael Maas, 2003) and Readings in Late Antiquity: A Sourcebook, 2nd Edition (2010).

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