Hollow Earth: The Long and Curious History of Imagining Strange Lands, Fantastical Creatures, Advanced Civilizatio

Front Cover
Hachette Books, Sep 10, 2007 - History - 304 pages
8 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
Beliefs in mysterious underworlds are as old as humanity. But the idea that the earth has a hollow interior was first proposed as a scientific theory in 1691 by Sir Edmond Halley (of comet fame), who suggested that there might be life down there as well. Hollow Earth traces the surprising, marvelous, and just plain weird permutations his ideas have taken over the centuries. From science fiction to utopian societies and even religions, Hollow Earth travels through centuries and cultures, exploring how each era's relationship to the idea of a hollow earth mirrored its hopes, fears, and values. Illustrated with everything from seventeenth-century maps to 1950s pulp art to movie posters and more, Hollow Earth is for anyone interested in the history of strange ideas that just won't go away.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
0
3 stars
7
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

An overview of some of the many theories about the earth being hollow, from Edmond Halley to John Cleves Symmes through to some of the current silliness bandied about on the internet. But largely a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AndreasJ - LibraryThing

The best bits are the early parts about Halley's attempt to account for the wandering of the magnetic poles by positing the Earth to consist of concentric shells - where he threw in the idea that the ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2007)

David Standish is the author of The Art of Money and has written for Smithsonian, Audubon, Esquire, Outside, Travel & Leisure, Playboy, and Chicago magazine. He lives in Chicago.

Bibliographic information