The Fairchild Books Dictionary of Interior Design

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Bloomsbury Publishing USA, Nov 4, 2021 - Design - 352 pages
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This seminal text demystifies the terminology around being an interior designer today, providing definitions of processes, techniques, features, and even some historical terms that a designer must know. The dictionary now includes coverage of sustainability, smart materials, new technologies, and processes. Coverage of non-Western cultures is expanded and provides insights into their influence in a global marketplace. This comprehensive reference covers multiple aspects of interior design and architecture, addressing structural and decorative features of interiors and their furnishings, business practices, green design, universal design, commercial and residential interiors, new workplace design, and institutional and hospitality facilities. The fourth edition also includes vocabulary and image flashcards via STUDIO for on-the-go studying.
 

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Contents

A
1
B
13
C
31
D
55
E
63
F
69
G
79
H
85
P
127
Q
141
R
143
S
151
T
169
U
179
V
181
W
185

I
91
J
95
K
97
L
101
M
109
N
119
O
123
X
191
Y
193
Z
195
Appendices
197
Bibliography
301
Copyright

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About the author (2021)

Mark Hinchman, PhD, RA, IDEC, is a Professor of Interior Design in the College of Architecture at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He teaches design history, architectural history, and interior design studio classes. His education includes studying urban design with Colin Rowe, and culminated with a PhD in Art History from the University of Chicago. In Frankfurt, Germany, he worked for Philipp Holzmann; in Chicago, he worked at Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill; ISD; and the Environments Group, specializing in corporate interiors. A Fulbright scholar in Senegal, West Africa, Hinchman's subsequent research interests were funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Graham Foundation, and the Getty Research Institute. He is on the board of The Society of Architectural Historians, and serves as co-editor of SAHARA, the digital image archive.

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