The Souvenir Gallery : an Illustrated Gift Book for All Seasons: Embellished with Thirteen Beautifully Finished Engravings, by the First Artists

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Emily Percival
Phillips, Sampson, 1853 - Gift books - 294 pages
 

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Page 294 - If Thou be one whose heart the holy forms Of young imagination have kept pure, Stranger ! henceforth be warned; and know that pride, Howe'er disguised in its own majesty, Is littleness ; that he who feels contempt For any living thing, hath faculties Which he has never used ; that thought with him Is in its infancy.
Page 246 - Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
Page 246 - Beware Of entrance to a quarrel ; but, being in, Bear 't that the opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice : Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.
Page 294 - ... who feels contempt For any living thing, hath faculties Which he has never used ; that thought with him Is in its infancy. The man whose eye Is ever on himself doth look on one, The least of Nature's works, one who might move The wise man to that scorn which wisdom holds Unlawful, ever. O be wiser, Thou ! Instructed that true knowledge leads to love, True dignity abides with him alone Who, in the silent hour of inward thought, Can still suspect, and still revere himself, In lowliness of heart.
Page 263 - Fie, fie upon her! There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks ; her wanton spirits look out At every joint and motive of her body.
Page 294 - Stranger! henceforth be warned; and know, that pride, Howe'er disguised in its own majesty, Is littleness ; that he who feels contempt For any living thing, hath faculties Which he has never used ; that thought with him Is in its infancy. The man whose eye Is ever on himself doth look on one, The least of Nature's works, one who might move 85 The wise man to that scorn which wisdom holds Unlawful, ever.
Page 205 - Such age how beautiful ! O Lady bright, Whose mortal lineaments seem all refined By favouring Nature and a saintly Mind To something purer and more exquisite Than flesh and blood ; whene'er thou meet'st my sight, When I behold thy blanched unwithered cheek, Thy temples fringed with locks of gleaming white, And head that droops because the soul is meek, Thee with the welcome Snowdrop I compare ; That child of winter, prompting thoughts that climb From desolation toward the genial prime ; Or with the...
Page 261 - Caireen women usually are, had little beside their youth, and the alluring arts of their profession, to recommend them. When they were told that we desired to witness their performances, they proceeded to conduct us to the coffee-house, where the greater part of their time was apparently consumed in sipping coffee, singing, and that sort of piquant conversation which becomes their calling.
Page 156 - ... The landscape looks an Eden ! Who could wear The frown of sorrow now ? This glorious hour Reveals the ruling God ! The heavens are bare ! Each sunny stream, and blossom-mantled bower Breathes of pervading love, and proves the Power That spoke him into life, hath bless'd Man's earthly dower.
Page 82 - Her lover sinks, — she sheds no ill-timed tear ; Her chief is slain, — she fills his fatal post ; Her fellows flee, — she checks their base career ; The foe retires, — she heads the sallying host...

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