Proceedings of the Symposium on Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Organics in Ground Water

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DIANE Publishing, 1996
 

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Contents

Using a Borehole Flowmeter To Locate and Characterize the Transmissive Zones of an Aquifer
33
Overview of the Technical Protocol for Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in Ground Water Under Development for the US...
37
The BIOSCREEN Computer Tool
62
Naval Air Station Cecil Field Florida
66
Case Study of Natural Attenuation of Trichloroethene at St Joseph Michigan
67
Extraction of Degradation Rate Constants From the St Joseph Michigan Trichloroethene Site
71
Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons at Plattsburgh Air Force Base New York
76
Natural Attenuation of a Trichloroethene Plume at Picatinny Arsenal New Jersey
85
Plant 44 Tucson Arizona
92
Remediation Technology Development Forum Intrinsic Remediation Project at Dover Air Force Base Delaware
95
Wurtsmith Air Force Base Michigan
100
Eielson Air Force Base Alaska
106
Considerations and Options for Regulatory Acceptance of Natural Attenuation in Ground Water
112
RiskBased Corrective Action
116
Informal Dialog on Issues of GroundWater and Core Sampling
118
Appropriate Opportunities for Application of Natural Attenuation in the Civilian Sector
120
US Air Force and Department of Defense
124
Intrinsic Remediation in the Industrial Marketplace
129
Environmental Chemistry and the Kinetics of Biotransformation of Chlorinated Organic Compounds in Ground Water
133
Compounds With Potential for Natural Attenuation
137
The Future of Natural Attenuation
142
Poster Session
144
Anaerobic Mineralization of Vinyl Chloride in IronIIIReducing Aquifer Sediments
146
Intrinsic Biodegradation of Chlorinated Aliphatics Under Sequential AnaerobicCometabolic Conditions
147
Analysis of Methane and Ethylene Dissolved in Ground Water
148
Intrinsic Bioattenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in a Fractured Bedrock System
158
Modeling Natural Attenuation of Selected Explosive Chemicals at a Department of Defense Site
159
LongTerm Application of Natural Attenuation at Sierra Army Depot
160
When Is Intrinsic Bioremediation CostEffective? FinancialRisk CostBenefit Analysis at Two Chlorinated Solvent Sites
161
The Dutch Situation
162
Natural Attenuation as a Cleanup Alternative for TetrachloroethyleneAffected Ground Water
163
Natural Attenuation of Trichloroethene in a Sandy Unconfined Aquifer
164
Analysis of Intrinsic Bioremediation of TrichloroetheneContaminated Ground Water at Eielson Air Force Base Alaska
165
Involvement of Dichloromethane in the Intrinsic Biodegradation of Chlorinated Ethenes and Ethanes
166
Intrinsic Bioremediation of 12Dichloroethane
167
A Practical Evaluation of Intrinsic Biodegradation of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds
168
Practical Experience at a Site Containing Chlorinated Solvents and Aromatic Hydrocarbons
169
Field and Laboratory Evaluations of Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Organics at a Complex Industrial Site
170
Assessment of Intrinsic Bioremediation of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons at Industrial Facilities
171
A Case Study
172
Patterns of Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons at Cape Canaveral Air Station Florida
173
Applying Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Organics in Conjunction With GroundWater Extraction for Aquifer Restoration
174
A Modular Computer Model for Simulating Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Organics in Saturated GroundWater Aquifers
175
State and Federal Regulatory Issues
178
Federal and State Meeting on Issues Impacting the Use of Natural Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents in Ground WaterAn Overview
179
Summary of Roundtable Discussion on Regulatory Issues
183
Appendix A
186
Symposium on Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Organics in Ground Water
187
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Page 141 - Bopp, MJ Brennan, ML Haberl, and C. Johnson. 1986. Rapid assay for screening and characterizing microorganisms for the ability to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 51:761-768.
Page 37 - natural attenuation as: The biodegradation, dispersion, dilution, sorption, volatilization, and/or chemical and biochemical stabilization of contaminants to effectively reduce contaminant toxicity, mobility, or volume to levels that are protective of human health and the ecosystem. In
Page 141 - van der Meer, JR, W. Roelofsen, G. Schraa, and AJB Zehnder. 1987. Degradation of low concentrations of dichlorobenzenes and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene by Pseudomonas sp. strain P51 in nonsterile soil columns. FEMS Microbiol.
Page 112 - return usable ground waters to their beneficial uses within a timeframe that is reasonable given the particular circumstances of the site.
Page 56 - The chemical behavior of chloride is neutral. Chloride ions generally do not enter into oxidation-reduction reactions, form no important solute complexes with other ions unless the chloride concentration is extremely high, do not form salts of low solubility, are not significantly adsorbed on mineral surfaces, and play few vital biochemical roles
Page iii - (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
Page 58 - The long-term monitoring plan consists of locating ground-water monitoring wells and developing a ground-water sampling and analysis strategy. This plan is used to monitor plume migration over time and to verify that natural attenuation is occurring at rates sufficient to protect potential downgradient receptors.
Page 187 - Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
Page 91 - and M. Martin. 1991. Overview of research activities on the movement and fate of chlorinated solvents in ground water at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. In: Morganwalp, DW, and DA Aronson, eds. US Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology
Page 60 - Bouwer, EJ, and JP Wright. 1988. Transformations of trace halogenated aliphatics in anoxic biofilm columns. J. Contam. Hydrol. 2:155-169.

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