Women and Power in Post-Conflict Africa

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 20, 2015 - Political Science - 300 pages
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The book explains an unexpected consequence of the decrease in conflict in Africa after the 1990s. Analysis of cross-national data and in-depth comparisons of case studies of Uganda, Liberia, and Angola show that post-conflict countries have significantly higher rates of women's political representation in legislatures and government compared with countries that have not undergone major conflict. They have also passed more legislative reforms and made more constitutional changes relating to women's rights. The study explains how and why these patterns emerged, tying these outcomes to the conjuncture of the rise of women's movements, changes in international women's rights norms, and, most importantly, gender disruptions that occur during war. This book will help scholars, students, women's rights activists, international donors, policy makers, non-governmental organizations (NGO), and others better understand some of the circumstances that are most conducive to women's rights reform today and why.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
3
16
Pathways to Change in Womens Rights
33
Forging a New Trajectory
49
The Power in Fighting for Peace
78
The Limits of Postconflict Gender Policy Reform
114
Womens Rights in Peace Agreements
145
Womens Rights in Postconflict Constitutions
171
Women and Leadership in Postconflict Countries
193
Womens Rights and Postconflict Legislative Reform
218
New Frontiers in the Study of Women Conflict and Peace
235
References
258
Index
277
89
286
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About the author (2015)

Aili Tripp is Professor of Political Science and Gender and Women's Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is author of several award-winning books, including Museveni's Uganda: Paradoxes of Power in a Hybrid Regime (2010), African Women's Movements: Transforming Political Landscapes (Cambridge, 2009), and Women and Politics in Uganda (2000). Professor Tripp is co-editor of the book series Women in Africa and the Diaspora. She has served as president of the African Studies Association and vice president of the American Political Science Association.