Hard Times: For These Times ~ Paperbound (Google eBook)

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Classic Books Company
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Contents

The One Thing Needful
1
Murdering the Innocents
3
A Loophole
10
Mr Bounderby
16
The Keynote
24
Slearys Horsemanship
31
Mrs Sparsit
46
Never Wonder
54
Men and Masters
162
Fading Away
170
Gunpowder
184
Explosion
198
Hearing the Last of it
212
Mrs Sparsits Staircase
222
Lower and Lower
227
Down
237

Sissys Progress
61
Stephen Blackpool
70
No Way Out
77
The Old Woman
86
Rachael
92
The Great Manufacturer
101
Father and Daughter
107
Husband and Wife
116
Effects in the Bank
123
Mr James Harthouse
138
The Whelp
147
Men and Brothers
153
Another Thing Needful
243
Very Ridiculous
250
Very Decided
261
Lost
271
Found
282
The Starlight
292
Whelphunting
303
Philosophical
316
Final
324
HUNTED DOWN
331
IN FOUR PARTS
361
GEORGE SILVERMANS EXPLANATION
407

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Page vii - Allowing for his manner of telling them, the things he tells us are always true. I wish that he could think it right to limit his brilliant exaggeration to works written only for public amusement; and when he takes up a subject of high national importance, such as that which he handled in Hard Times, that he would use severer and more accurate analysis.
Page 24 - It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it; but as matters stood it was a town of unnatural red and black like the painted face of a savage.
Page 6 - You must paper it," said the gentleman, rather warmly. "You must paper it," said Thomas Gradgrind, "whether you like it or not. Don't tell us you wouldn't paper it. What do you mean, boy?" "I'il explain to you, then," said the gentleman, after another and a dismal pause, "why you wouldn't paper a room with representations of horses.
Page 4 - Indeed, as he eagerly sparkled at them from the cellarage before mentioned, he seemed a kind of cannon loaded to the muzzle with facts, and prepared to blow them clean out of the regions of childhood at one discharge. He seemed a galvanizing apparatus, too, charged with a grim mechanical substitute for the tender young imaginations that were to be stormed away.
Page 6 - ... he had a genius for coming up to the scratch, wherever and whatever it was, and proving himself an ugly customer. He would go in and damage any subject whatever with his right, follow up with his left, stop, exchange, counter, bore his opponent (he always fought All England) to the ropes, and fall upon him neatly. He was certain to knock the wind out of common sense, and render that unlucky adversary deaf to the call of time.
Page 2 - ... the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside. The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, — nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, — all helped the emphasis. 'In this life, we want nothing but Facts, Sir; nothing but Facts!

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