A Biographical History of England, from Egbert the Great to the Revolution: Consisting of Characters Disposed in Different Classes, and Adapted to a Methodical Catalogue of Engraved British Heads. Intended as an Essay Towards Reducing Our Biography to System, and a Help to the Knowledge of Portraits. Interspersed with Variety of Anecdotes, and Memoirs of a Great Number of Persons. With a Preface, Volume 1, Part 2

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Page 272 - THIS BOOK. FORMS PART OF THE ORIGINAL LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BOUGHT IN EUROPE 1838 TO 1839 BY ASA CRAY a, >^ ^f-, LITERARY REMAINS OF TUB LATE WILLIAM HAZLITT.
Page 439 - Custom, when he studied, was to put on a long quilted Cap, which came an Inch over his Eyes, serving as an Umbrella to defend them from too much light, and seldom eating a Dinner, would every three hours or more be maunching a Roll of Bread, and now and then refresh his exhausted Spirits with Ale brought to him by his Servant.
Page 502 - Veritate in my hand, and kneeling on my knees, devoutly said these words : — " ' O thou eternal God, Author of the light which now shines upon me, and giver of all inward illuminations, I do beseech Thee of Thy infinite goodness to pardon a greater request than a sinner ought to make ; I am not satisfied enough whether I shall publish this book De Veritate...
Page 286 - Judicio Pylium, genio Socratem, arte Maronem Terra tegit, populus maeret, Olympus habet. Stay, passenger, why goest thou by so fast? Read, if thou canst, whom envious death hath...
Page 281 - That tobacco was the lively image and pattern of hell; for that it had, by allusion, in it all the parts and vices of the world whereby hell may be gained; to wit: First, It was a smoke; so are the vanities of this world.
Page 566 - He probably did not remain long in slavery ; for at the beginning of the civil war he was made a captain in the royal army, and in 1644 attended the queen to France, where he remained till the Restoration. At last, upon suspicion of his being privy to the popish plot, he was taken up in 1682, and confined in the Gatehouse, Westminster ; where he ended his life, in the sixty-third year of his age.
Page 285 - This figure that thou here seest put, It was for gentle SHAKESPEARE cut, Wherein the graver had a strife With nature, to out-do the life : O could he but have drawn his wit As well in brass, as he hath hit His face ; the print would then surpass All that was ever writ in brass. But since he cannot, reader, look Not on his picture, but his book.
Page 571 - Is any thing more common, than to see our ladies of quality wear such high shoes as they cannot walk in, without one to lead them ; and a gown as long again as their body, so that they cannot stir to the next room, without a page or two to hold it up...
Page 501 - ... because it was possible she might be conversant in romances), and by her judgment was guided whether to receive or reject it.
Page 481 - ... memory serves him, occupies between five and six hundred printed quarto pages, and must therefore have filled more pages of manuscript than the number mentioned in the text, has this quatrain at the end of the volume — With one good pen I wrote this book, Made of a grey goose quill ; A pen it was when it I took, And a pen I leave it still.

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