Reflections on the Painting and Sculpture of the Greeks: With Instructions for the Connoisseur, and an Essay on Grace in Works of Art

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Translator, and sold, 1765 - Art - 287 pages
 

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Page 28 - Pangs piercing every muscle, every labouring nerve; pangs which we almost feel ourselves, while we consider — not the face, nor the most expressive parts — only the belly contracted by excruciating pains: these however, I say, exert not themselves with violence, either in the face or gesture. He pierces not heaven, like the Laocoon of Virgil; his mouth is rather opened to discharge an anxious overloaded groan, as Sadolet says; the struggling body and the supporting mind exert themselves with...
Page 12 - Venus ; or that others formed the graces from Lais ; it is to be underftood that they did fo, without neglecting thefe great laws of the art. Senfual beauty furnifhed the painter with all that nature could give ; ideal beauty with the awful and fublime ; from that he took the Humane, from this the Divine. c Vide Stofch Pierres gray.
Page 14 - Iparing fagacity, and, as relative to a completer and more perfect Nature, offered but as hints, nay, often perceived only by the learned. The probability ftill increafes, that the bodies of the Greeks, as well as the works of their artifts, were framed with more unity of fyftem, a nobler harmony of parts, and a completenefs of the whole, above our lean tenfions and hollow wrinkles. Probability, 'tis true, is all we can pretend to : but it...
Page 2 - The most beautiful body of ours would perhaps be as much inferior to the most beautiful Greek one, as Iphicles was to his brother Hercules. The forms of the Greeks, prepared to beauty, by the influence of the mildest and purest sky, became perfectly elegant by their early exercises.
Page 2 - It is not only nature which the votaries of the Greeks find in their works, but still more, something superior to nature; ideal beauties, brain-born images, as Proclus says.
Page 7 - Autolycus, Lysis; Phidias for the improvement of his art by their beauty. Here he studied the elasticity of the muscles, the ever varying motions of the frame, the outlines of fair forms, or the contour left by the young wrestler on the sand. Here beautiful nakedness appeared with such a liveliness of expression, such truth and variety of situations, such a noble air of the body...
Page 21 - Michael j4ngelot perhaps, may be faid to have attained the antique ; but only in ftrong mufcular figures, heroic frames ; not in thofe of tender youth ; nor in female bodies, which, under his bold hand, grew Amazons. The Greek artift, on the contrary, adjufted his Contour, in every figure, to the breadth of a fingle hair, even in the niceft and moft tirefome performances, as gems. Confider the Diomedes and Perfeus of Diofcorides h, Hercules and Jole by Teucer \ and admire the inimitable Greeks.
Page 22 - This Contour reigns in Greek figures, even when covered with drapery, as the chief aim of the artist: the beautiful frame pierces the marble like a transparent Coan cloth.' All neoclassical sculptors must have paid deep attention to such passages, for contour was henceforth to become a prime factor in design. In 1754 Winckelmann entered the Roman Church and in the next years left Dresden...
Page 17 - Greek rule of beauty, the modern artift goes on the fureft way to the imitation of Nature, The ideas of unity and perfection, which he acquired in meditating on antiquity, will help him to combine, and to ennoble the more fcattered and weaker beauties of our Nature.
Page 31 - Contraft is the darling of their ideas ; in it they fancy every perfection. They fill their performances with cometlike excentric fouls, defpifing every thing but an Ajax or a Capaneus. Arts have their infancy as well as men > they begin, as well as the artift, with froth and bombaft : in fuch bufkins the mufe of...

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