The Heart of the Matter

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Penguin, 1971 - Adultery - 271 pages
41 Reviews

Scobie is an officer in a war-torn West African state. When he is passed over for a promotion, he borrows money to send his wife away on holiday. In her absence, he falls in love with Helen, a young widow, and his life is transformed. With an inability to distinguish between love, pity and responsibility, Scobie moves towards his final damnation...

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User Review  - gypsysmom - LibraryThing

I've never read anything by Graham Greene before but this book was chosen by the LT 1001 Books Group as the August 2017 read and it seemed like a good place to start. I found the subject matter ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tommi180744 - LibraryThing

Greene piles angst on angst with the religiosity he's known for - it could be tedious - however, this author's eloquent style coupled with sharp observation of the human condition keeps the reader ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
11
II
61
III
83
IV
109
V
111
VI
163
VII
177
VIII
203
X
214
XI
226
XII
238
XIII
249
XIV
255
XV
260
XVI
267
Copyright

IX
205

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About the author (1971)

Born in 1904, Graham Greene was the son of a headmaster and the fourth of six children. Preferring to stay home and read rather than endure the teasing at school that was a by-product of his father's occupation, Greene attempted suicide several times and eventually dropped out of school at the age of 15. His parents sent him to an analyst in London who recommended he try writing as therapy. He completed his first novel by the time he graduated from college in 1925. Greene wrote both entertainments and serious novels. Catholicism was a recurring theme in his work, notable examples being The Power and the Glory (1940) and The End of the Affair (1951). Popular suspense novels include: The Heart of the Matter, Our Man in Havana and The Quiet American. Greene was also a world traveler and he used his experiences as the basis for many books. One popular example, Journey Without Maps (1936), was based on a trip through the jungles of Liberia. Greene also wrote and adapted screenplays, including that of the 1949 film, The Third Man, which starred Orson Welles. He died in Vevey, Switzerland in 1991.

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