The School World: A Monthly Magazine of Educational Work and Progress, Volume 5

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Macmillan and Company, Limited, 1903 - Education
 

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Page 149 - Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend.
Page 7 - That man, I think, has had a liberal education, who has been so trained in youth that his body is the ready servant of his will, and does with ease and pleasure all the work, that, as a mechanism, it is capable of...
Page 278 - Thus the proposition, that the sum of the three angles of a triangle is equal to two right angles, (Euc.
Page 224 - If two triangles have one angle of the one equal to one angle of the other and the sides about these equal angles proportional, the triangles are similar.
Page 150 - There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream, The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream. It is not now as it hath been of yore; — Turn wheresoe'er I may, By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more.
Page 149 - My good blade carves the casques of men, My tough lance thrusteth sure, My strength is as the strength of ten, Because my heart is pure.
Page 10 - And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he spake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.
Page 223 - If two sides of a triangle are unequal, the greater side has the greater angle opposite to it ; and the converse. Of all the straight lines that can be drawn to a given straight line from a given point outside it, the perpendicular is the shortest. The opposite sides and angles of a parallelogram are equal, each diagonal bisects the parallelogram, and the diagonals bisect one another.
Page 151 - A heart, with English instinct fraught, He yet can call his own. Ay, tear his body limb from limb, Bring cord, or axe, or flame : He only knows, that not through him Shall England come to shame. Far Kentish hop-fields round him seem'd Like dreams, to come and go...
Page 160 - A Short History of Natural Science and of the Progress of Discovery, From the Time of the Greeks to the Present Time.

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