Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage, and of a Residence in the Arctic Regions During the Years 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833, Volume 2

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A.W. Webster, 1835 - Natural history
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Page lxxiii - September, and after being exposed to the severe winter temperature of the next three months, they were brought into a warm cabin, where, in less than two hours, every one of them returned to life, and continued for a whole day walking about. They were again exposed to the air at a temperature of about 40...
Page x - ... that surrounded our vessel, and came boldly on deck, where our crew were walking for exercise. Undismayed at the presence of twelve or fourteen men, he seized upon a canister which had some meat in it, and was in so ravenous a state that whilst busily engaged at his feast he suffered me to pass a noose over his head, by which he was immediately secured and strangled. By discharging the contents of two secretory organs, it emitted a most insupportable stench. These secretory vessels are about...
Page xvi - February ; and next morning, after having been exposed to a temperature of 30 below zero, the fur on the cheeks and a patch on each shoulder had become perfectly white. On the following day...
Page xvii - Regions, the most desolate and steril that can be conceived, where this animal is not to be found, and that too throughout the winter : nor does it seek to shelter itself from the inclemency of the weather by burrowing in the snow, but is found generally sitting solitary under the lee of a large stone, where the snow-drift as it passes along seems in some measure to afford a protection from the bitterness of the blast that impels it, by collecting around and half burying the animal beneath it.
Page vi - Of the many circumstances of high gratification which have welcomed the delivery of myself and my companions from four years of severe suffering, there is nothing (next after a deep sense of the merciful Providence wherewith we have been surrounded in such great perils) which has excited so strong a feeling of gratitude as the humane and generous sympathy of a number of persons who, at the chance of being instrumental in our preservation, contributed, with the assistance of His Majesty's Government,...
Page 116 - ... attraction in electricity to resolve itself into the case of charging a coated non-conducting body, and that the phenomena always correspond to those observed in the latter. On the Aurora Borealis. By Sir JOHN Ross. Having observed in his first arctic expedition that the aurora sometimes appeared between the two ships, and also between the ships and the icebergs, and found in his subsequent experience, both in Scotland and during the second arctic voyage, proofs satisfactory to his own mind that...
Page xxx - ... occurring within the Arctic Circle, and in Franklin's Journal. Several pairs were seen at Melville Island, and Sir John Richardson gives a description of one killed at Fort Franklin in March, 1826. Sir James Ross (' Appendix to Sir John Ross's Second Voyage,' p. 28), speaking of the Raven, says, " This is one of the few birds that are capable of braving the severity of an arctic winter, and of enduring the scorching rays of a tropical sun without any change being produced in its plumage by the...
Page ix - Polar journey, having lived for several days wholly on two bears that were shot, the skin pealed off the feet, legs, and arms of many of the party. It was then attributed rather to the quantity than the quality of the meat, and to our having been for some time previous on very short allowance of provision.
Page xvi - ... a patch on each shoulder had become perfectly white. On the following day the patches on each shoulder had extended considerably, and on the posterior part of the body and flanks had turned to a dirty white. During the next four days the change continued but slowly, and at the end of a week it was entirely white, with the exception of a dark band across the shoulders, prolonged posteriorly down to the middle of the back, forming a kind of saddle, where the colour of the fur had not changed in...

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