Critical Cyberculture Studies

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David Silver, Adrienne Massanari
NYU Press, Sep 1, 2006 - Psychology - 323 pages
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Starting in the early 1990s, journalists and scholars began responding to and trying to take account of new technologies and their impact on our lives. By the end of the decade, the full-fledged study of cyberculture had arrived. Today, there exists a large body of critical work on the subject, with cutting-edge studies probing beyond the mere existence of virtual communities and online identities to examine the social, cultural, and economic relationships that take place online.

Taking stock of the exciting work that is being done and positing what cyberculture’s future might look like, Critical Cyberculture Studies brings together a diverse and multidisciplinary group of scholars from around the world to assess the state of the field. Opening with a historical overview of the field by its most prominent spokesperson, it goes on to highlight the interests and methodologies of a mobile and creative field, providing a much-needed how-to guide for those new to cyberstudies. The final two sections open up to explore issues of race, class, and gender and digital media's ties to capital and commerce—from the failure of dot-coms to free software and the hacking movement.

This flagship book is a must-read for anyone interested in the dynamic and increasingly crucial study of cyberculture and new technologies.

 

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Contents

Where Is Internet Studies?
1
Fielding the Field
9
Critical Approaches and Methods
10
The Historiography of Cyberculture
17
From CyberStudies
37
Internet Studies in Times of Terror
47
Considering Cyberculture
55
An Antidisciplinary
68
A Study of Online
129
Overcoming Institutional Marginalization
140
Interrogating
159
The Construction of Cybersocial Reality
168
Bridging Cyberspace
181
An Interdisciplinary Approach to
194
Power to Marginalized Cultures of Difference
205
Cyberstudies and the Politics of Visibility
216

Finding the Quality in Qualitative Research
79
Web Sphere Analysis and Cybercultural Studies
88
ComputerMediated
97
The Structural Problems of the Internet
107
ICTs and Reforming
270
Business Relationships
294
Copyright

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Page 8 - Because we cannot see one another in cyberspace, gender, age, national origin, and physical appearance are not apparent unless a person wants to make such characteristics public.

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About the author (2006)

David Silver is an assistant professor of media studies at the University of San Francisco.

Adrienne Massanari is a Ph.D. candidate in communication at the University of Washington.

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