The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Medes & Persians, Macedonians, and Grecians, Volume 2

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Silas Andrus, bookseller. Hart & Lincoln printers, Middletown, 1815 - History, Ancient
 

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Contents

The battle of Platæa
47
The battle of the Mycale The defeat of the Persians
49
The barbarous and inhuman revenge of Amestris the wife of Xerxes
50
The Athenians rebuild the walls of their city notwith standing the opposition of the Lacedæmonians
52
The black design of Themistocles rejected unanimously by the people of Athens
54
The Lacedæmonians lose the chief command through the pride and arrogance of Pausanias
56
Pausanias secret conspiracy with the Persians His death
57
Themistocles flies for shelter to king Admetus
59
Aristides disinterested administration of the public treasure His death and eulogium
61
Death of Xerxes killed by Artabanus His character
65
BOOK VII
69
Themistocles lies to Artaxerxes
70
Cimon begins to make a figure at Athens
73
The Egyptians rise against Persia supported by the Atheni
79
Character of Pericles c
85
Cimon is recalled His death
91
Jealousy and contests arise between the Athenians and
99
Troubles excited against Pericles c
106
Famous persons and cities in Græcia Major c
119
The war of Peloponnesus
125
The Lacedæmonians besiege Platæa
137
The Athepians possess themselves of Pylus c
146
CHAPTER II
151
Sect II The Athenians make themselves masters of the island
155
Alcibiades engages the Athenians in the war of Sicily
165
The Athenians prepare to set sail c
172
Description of Syracuse
178
The Syracusans resolve to capitulate but Gylippus arri
186
The Athenians again hazard a sea fight and are defeated
195
Consequences of the defeat of the Athenians in Sicily f c
203
Alteration in the government of Athens Alcibiades recall
209
The Lacedæmonians appoint Lysander admiral He beats
216
Lysander commands the Lacedæmonian fleet His celebra
225
The expedition of Artaxerxes against the Cadusians His
303
Birth and education of Socrates
309
Page
312
Socrates devotes himself entirely to the instruction of
315
Socrates is accused of holding bad opinions in regard to
322
Socrates refuses escape out of prison He drinks
330
Reflections upon Socrates and the sentence passed upon
338
nent of Sparta
344
Of the government of Athens
355
Of the magistrates
362
Of the education of the youth
368
Of the different kind of troops which composed the armies
375
Peculiar character of the Athenians
381
BOOK XI
387
Commotions in Sicily and at Syracuse against Dionysius
394
Dionysius declares war against the Carthaginians Various
400
Violent passion of Dionysius for Poesy His death and
407
The history of Dionysius the younger
415
Banishment of Dion
421
Character of Dion
439
Timoleon restores liberty to Syracuse and institutes wise
446
BOOK XII
453
Sphodrias forms a design against the Piræus
462
The two Theban generals at their return are accused
473
Epaminondas chosen general of the Thebans His death
484
Death of Evagoras king of Salamin Character of that
491
Troubles at the court of Artaxerxes concerning his suc
499
War of the allies against the Athenians
504
Demosthenes excites the Athenians for war Death of Mausolus Grief of Artemisa his wife
508
Expedition of Ochus against Phænicia Cyprus and Egypt
513
Death of Ocbus Arses succeeds him
518
Abridgment of the life of Demosthenes
519
Digression on the manner of fitting out fleets by the Athe nians
524

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Page 84 - Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal up the vision and the prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.
Page 84 - Know therefore and understand, that from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince shall be seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks : the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times. And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself...
Page 84 - And he shall confirm the covenant with many for one week: and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease, and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate.
Page 489 - He possessed all the ornaments of the mind : he had the talent of speaking in perfection, and was well versed in the most sublime sciences. But a modest reserve threw a veil over all those excellent qualities, which still augmented their value, and he knew not what it was to be ostentatious of them.
Page 309 - Socrates mihi videtur, id quod constat inter omnes, primus a rebus occultis et ab ipsa natura involutis, in quibus omnes ante eum philosophi occupati fuerunt, avocavisse philosophiam et ad vitam communem adduxisse, ut de virtutibus et...
Page 333 - Presently after, they entered, and found Socrates, whose chains had been taken off,' sitting by Xantippe his wife, who held one of his children in her arms. As soon as she perceived them, setting up great cries, sobbing, and tearing her face and hair, she made the prison resound with her complaints,
Page 331 - ... their lives or liberty : ought there to be any thing more dear and precious to them, than the preservation of Socrates ? Even strangers themselves dispute that honour with them, many of whom have come expressly, with considerable sums of money, to purchase...
Page 161 - Alcibiades had abandoned himself. Alcibiades, in those moments when he listened to Socrates, differed so much from himself, that he appeared quite another man. However, his headstrong, fiery temper, and his natural fondness for pleasure, which was heightened and inflamed by the...
Page 325 - ... voice but his own in his defence, and to appear before his judges in the submissive posture of a suppliant, he did not behave in that manner out of pride, or contempt of the tribunal ; it was from a noble and intrepid assurance, resulting from greatness of soul, and the...
Page 337 - he formed our youth, and taught our children to love their country, and to honour their parents. In this place he gave us his admirable lessons, and sometimes made us seasonable reproaches, to engage us more warmly in the pursuit of virtue.

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