The Annual Biography and Obituary for the Year ..., Volume 9

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1825 - Great Britain
 

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Page 37 - I know that he is not formally before the Court, but for that very reason, I will bring him before the Court. He has placed these men in the front of the battle, in hopes to escape under their shelter, but I will not join in battle with them : their vices, though screwed up to the highest pitch of human depravity, are not of dignity enough to vindicate the combat with me; I will drag him to light who is the dark mover behind this scene of iniquity.
Page 456 - Round whose rude shaft dark ivy-tresses grew Yet dripping with the forest's noonday dew, Vibrated, as the ever-beating heart Shook the weak hand that grasped it; of that crew He came the last, neglected and apart; A herd-abandoned deer struck by the hunter's dart.
Page 83 - Thus I proceeded from one cave to another, all full of mummies piled up in various ways, some standing, some lying, and some on their heads. The purpose of my researches was to rob the Egyptians of their papyri; of which I found a few hidden in their breasts, under their arms, in the space above the knees, or on the legs, and covered by the numerous folds of cloth, that envelop the mummy.
Page 307 - His Lordship continued to get worse : but Dr. Bruno said, he thought letting blood again would save his life ; and I lost no time in telling my master how necessary it was to comply with the doctor's wishes. To this he replied by saying, he feared they knew nothing about his disorder ; and then, stretching out his arm, said, ' Here, take my arm, and do whatever you like.
Page 456 - Is it not broken? On the withering flower The killing sun smiles brightly: on a cheek The life can burn in blood, even while the heart may break.
Page 65 - Instead of standing before him in judgment with the hopes and consolations of Christians, we must call upon the mountains to cover us; for which of us can present, for omniscient examination, a pure, unspotted, and faultless course? But I humbly expect that the benevolent Author of our being will judge us as I have been pointing out for your example. Holding up the great volume of our lives in His hands, and regarding the general scope of them — if He discovers benevolence, charity and...
Page 47 - ... evidence that it was published by him with a different spirit and intention from those in which it was written. The question, therefore, is correctly what I just now stated it to be : — Could Mr. Hastings have been condemned to infamy for writing this book?
Page 456 - Midst others of less note came one frail form, A phantom among men, companionless As the last cloud of an expiring storm, Whose thunder is its knell.
Page 310 - I must sleep now ;' upon which he laid down, never to rise again ! for he did not move hand or foot during the following twenty-four hours. His lordship appeared, however, to be in a state of suffocation at intervals, and had a frequent rattling in the throat ; on these occasions, I called Tita to assist me in raising his head, and I thought he seemed to get quite stiff. The rattling and...
Page 114 - Some Passages of the Life and Death of John Earl of Rochester ;" which the critic ought to read for its elegance, the philosopher for its arguments, and the saint for its piety.

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