Glastonbury abbey, a poem. [Followed by] Minor poems

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Page 136 - SWEET flower ! though many a ruthless storm Sweep fiercely o'er thy slender form, And many a sturdier plant may bow In death beneath the tempest's blow, Submissive thou, in pensive guise...
Page 105 - VIII. having some disputes with one of the abbots, threatened to burn his kitchen, thereby insinuating a reproach for his gluttony and luxurious manner of living ; to which the abbot haughtily answered, that he would build such a one, that all the wood in the royal forests should not suffice to accomplish that...
Page 123 - ... abbot of the mitred monastery of Hyde, near Winchester, boarded within his own abbatical house, in that monastery, eight young gentlemen, who were placed there for the sake of literary instruction, and who dined at the abbot's table. The apartments of the abbot of Glastonbury resembled, we are told, a kind of well disciplined court, where the sons of noblemen and of the gentry were sent for virtuous education; and Richard Whiting, the last abbot of Glastonbury, who was cruelly executed by Henry...
Page 122 - Fridays, weekly, all the poor of the country were relieved by his particular charity ; and when he went abroad (which he seldom did, but to national synods, general chapters, and...
Page 104 - And if that one live well and virtuously, In way of grace, like as he ought to go, The remanent assaile him with envy, And him oppresse with grievous payne of wo, Until he folowe like as the other do.
Page 117 - Germany, enjoined Leopold Duke of Austria, who had taken the King prisoner, that one of the conditions of his release should be to make Savaricus...
Page 107 - Saviour, who signified to him that he was to honor the same Archangel in the same place, for a testimony of the certainty of which his left arm was withered, and was not restored till he had acquainted the rest of his brethren below with what he had seen.
Page 113 - Canute about the year 1030, went to Glastonbury to see the tomb of King Edmund Ironside (whom he used to call his Brother) and bestowed upon it a very rich embroidered pall with apples of gold and pearls—The apples were evidently intended in honor of the name of " Avalon" whose derivation I bave already explained.
Page 114 - Gregorian song, used by that Monastery time out of mind, and imposed upon them a new sort of Church song invented by one William Fiscamp a Norman—He pinched them in their diet, and in a word so tyrannized' over them 4hat they refused to submit to many of his innovations.
Page 109 - In this combat, which continued almost a whole day after horrible bloodshed on both sides, King Arthur with the courage and fury of a lion, rushed...

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