To the Lighthouse

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Wordsworth Editions, 1994 - Fiction - 159 pages
22 Reviews

With an Introduction and Notes by Dr Nicola Bradbury, University of Reading.

This simple and haunting story captures the transcience of life and its surrounding emotions.

To the Lighthouse is the most autobiographical of Virginia Woolf's novels. It is based on her own early experiences, and while it touches on childhood and children's perceptions and desires, it is at its most trenchant when exploring adult relationships, marriage and the changing class-structure in the period spanning the Great War.


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User Review  - eclecticdodo - LibraryThing

Not my usual type of read, but I'm so glad I risked it. This really is the perfect book for those feeling depressed and overwhelmed. The language is stunning. Even though nothing much really "happens ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - humblewomble - LibraryThing

The very stone one kicks with one's boot will outlast Shakespeare. I'm trying to think of something to say about To the Lighthouse that adequately sums up how I felt about it. And I can't. It's often ... Read full review

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About the author (1994)

Virginia Woolf was born in London, England on January 25, 1882. She was the daughter of the prominent literary critic Leslie Stephen. Her early education was obtained at home through her parents and governesses. After death of her father in 1904, her family moved to Bloomsbury, where they formed the nucleus of the Bloomsbury Group, a circle of philosophers, writers, and artists. During her lifetime, she wrote both fiction and non-fiction works. Her novels included Jacob's Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, and Between the Acts. Her non-fiction books included The Common Reader, A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas, The Captain's Death Bed and Other Essays, and The Death of the Moth and Other Essays. Having had periods of depression throughout her life and fearing a final mental breakdown from which she might not recover, Woolf drowned herself on March 28, 1941 at the age of 59. Her husband published part of her farewell letter to deny that she had taken her life because she could not face the terrible times of war.

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