Visions of Unity: The Golden Pandita Shakya Chokden's New Interpretation of Yogacara and Madhyamaka

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SUNY Press, Dec 1, 2011 - Religion - 463 pages
This landmark book discusses the thought of Tibetan Buddhist thinker Shakya Chokden (1428 1507) on the two major systems of Mah?y?na Buddhism. Influential and controversial in his own day, Shakya Chokden s thought fell out of favor over time and his writings were eventually repressed, becoming available again only in the 1970s. Yet, his startling interpretations of the core areas of Buddhist thought remain valuable and well worth consideration today. Yaroslav Komarovski has used the twenty-four volumes of Shakya Chokden s collected work to provide a systematic presentation of a central aspect of his thought: a reconciliation of Yog?c?ra and Madhyamaka. Providing a detailed analysis of the two systems mutual refutations of each other, Shakya Chokden argues for their fundamental compatibility and shared vision.

In analyzing Shakya Chokden s ideas, Komarovski explores some of the most important issues of both traditional and modern Buddhist scholarship, including contested approaches to the nature of reality, the relationship between philosophy and contemplative practice, inter- and intrasectarian Buddhist polemics, and the nature of consciousness and mental processes.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1 Life and Works of the Golden Pandita
17
Chapter 2 The Intellectual Background of Shakya Chokdens Interpretation of Yogacara and Madhyamaka
71
Revisiting Doxographical Hierarchies
109
Reconciling Yogacara and Madhyamaka
157
Shakya Chokdens Position on Primordial Mind
213
The Grand UnityShakya Chokdens Middle Way
269
EnglishTibetan with Sanskrit parallels
279
Spellings of Tibetan Names and Terms
299
Notes
307
Bibliography
391
Index
423
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About the author (2011)

Yaroslav Komarovski is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Nebraska Lincoln.

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