Engines of Creation

Front Cover
Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1990 - Science - 298 pages
5 Reviews
This brilliant work heralds the new age of nanotechnology, which will give us thorough and inexpensive control of the structure of matter. Drexler examines the enormous implications of these developments for medicine, the economy, and the environment, and makes astounding yet well-founded projections for the future.
 

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Great Book

User Review  - nubianangel - Overstock.com

Engines of Creation is a very good book to help the nonscientist get a grasp on the complexities of nano technology where we are and where we could go with it. While it breaks the information down to ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mentatjack - LibraryThing

This is one of my favorite science non-fiction books ever. If you've enjoyed any of the nanotechnology in science fiction in the last few decades, it was probably informed in some way by Drexler's ... Read full review

Contents

Engines of Construction
3
The Principles of Change
21
Predicting and Projecting
39
Engines of Abundance
53
Thinking Machines
64
The World Beyond Earth
83
Engines of Healing
99
Long Life in an Open World
117
A Door to the Future
130
Engines of Destruction
171
I2 Strategies and Survival
191
I3 Finding the Facts
203
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About the author (1990)

K. Eric Drexler is an American engineer best known as the founding father of nanotechnology. Drexler popularized the potential of molecular nanotechnology during his years of study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He earned three degrees from MIT; a B.S. in Interdisciplinary Sciences, an M.S. in Astro/Aerospace Engineering, and a Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab. His thesis on molecular nanotechnology, the first doctoral degree on the topic, was published as Nanosystems: Molecular Machinery, Manufacturing, and Computation (1992). The book received the Association of American Publishers award for Best Computer Science Book of 1992. He currently resides in Oxford.

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