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a spot held sacred from childhood, copied. Besides working and reading, and it was very pleasant to find our. a great deal of conversation takes selves once more seated in a railway place which may be turned to good accarriage. We thought of our journey count. Often mother, daughters, and to the Association and other places, sons' wives, learned together. Several but the scenery oh, how different could read the Scriptures underIn an hour we found ourselves in standingly. One had borrowed a Serampore with its broad smooth bible, and commencing with Genesis river, and picturesque scenery. We had read quite through to Revelabreakfasted with Mr. and Mrs. tions. She then returned the book Robinson, and afterwards called upon with many thanks, and when told Mr. Dakin from Loughborough. she might keep it for use she said Mrs. D. is the daughter of a very that would not be approved. A devoted missionary, the late Mr. friend of hers hearing this conversaPenny. From thence we went to tion, said if you please I should like Mr. Sampson's; Mr. S. was from to take home the book and read it home on a missionary tour; after a through. In connection with these pleasant chat with Mrs. S. we went females, two day schools for girls a few yards further and found Mr. have been established, which and Mrs. Trafford and children. visited by Miss M. Every effort Here we met with one of our fellow to benefit heathen females seems to passengers, (Mr. Etherington) and a me especially interesting. I was dear sister from whom we had been at once carried back to a spot in a separated four years, they are to be green field opposite my father's stationed at Merut.

house, where I stood more than One other visit I must mention, twenty years ago with Mrs. Lacey, it was to Bhowanipore, a station and learned from her lips that it was connected with the London Mission, not only possible but practicable for and the residence of the late much an English female to communicate lamented Mrs. Mullens and her directly the words of life to heathen father, Mr. Lacroix. Many have women in their own homes. This read with deep interest her letters branch of missionary labour attended on Zenana visiting, which were as it is with discouragements is full published in our Missionary Observer of interest, and never has the gospel last year. Often on our passage appeared to me so sweet, so glorious, out have we conversed on the mys- as when I have been permitted to terious Providence that called her unfold it to these long neglected away in the midst of so much use. daughters of Eve. fulness, and often was the question I had the pleasure of breakfasting asked, who will carry on her work ? | with Mrs. and Miss Lacroix, Miss Oh how delighted I was to find that Cowen, and the Misses Mullens, the her mantle had fallen on her two younger of these with the assistance lovely daughters; the eldest with of her grandmamma, Mrs. Lacroix, the assistance of an intelligent native visits and attends to the native christian, systematically carries on christians. She took me to several the work of visiting and teaching houses in the village, I was much the wives of native gentlemen; in pleased with the air of intelligence one day they are able to teach and social comfort that met my eye, reading and needlework in two and was not a little interested in the families. Sometimes the females thought that these very people had from two houses may be united in suggested to Mrs. Mullens, the these instructions, but more fre- varied and life-like pictures sketched quently such an arrangement is im. in her “ Phulmani and Karuna," pra icable. Miss Mullens showed a little work admirably calculated me a beautiful worked cushion to benefit native christians. I had nicely shaded in Berlin wool, which almost forgotten to say that Miss one of these heathen women had | M. told me the Zenana visiting of Letter from Mrs. Stubbins.

117 the present time took its rise from The feeling realized the first Sabbath two wealthy families, that Mrs. Sale, of our return will never be forgotten. the wife of a Baptist missionary, The well filled chapel, the dear old was in the habit of teaching in familiar faces, made me feel perIntally. When going home for her fectly at home; nevertheless, I was health she committed them to Mrs. forcibly carried back to the sorrowMullens, the latter was much in- ful season when for the last time beterested in the plan, and speedily fore going home, we surrounded the discovered other families in her own Lord's table, and when my husband neighbourhood who were willing to bade them all farewell, and now he be taught.

was permitted to address them once On the 14th December, we left more; he did not feel able to give for Cuttack. As bearers could not them a regular sermon, but read as possibly be obtained for so large a a motto, Phil. i. 8., “For God is party, we were obliged to divide. my record how greatly I long after The journey by dawk has so often you,” &c. After some introductory been described, that I may very remarks relating to bis own feelings well pass over it, except just to towards them, he described his own mention that on two occasions we and brother Brooks's visits to the had to wait many hours for bearers, churches. The numerous inquiries consequently our visit to Balasore about, and deep interest felt in them was reduced to three hours. Here and their children, the farewell we found Mr. and Mrs. Miller, and services at Derby, and lastly the very much did we enjoy our short parting scene on board the Shannon. interview. The previous day we Ever since our arrival we have had stayed with the Hallam's whom had little parties of native christians we saw on our way going home. coming to see us daily, and since I That season dear Miss Crawford commenced this, I have constantly needed a change, and last year set had to lay down my pen to talk to the noble example of returning to one and another. Dear old Gunga her work. This year Mr. Bachelor Dhor has been seriously ill, but has has returned leaving his wife and again rallied ; when I first saw him family behind. We had the unex- on the week day he clasped both my pected pleasure of meeting him in hands in his and said, “I did think Calcutta.

I should have gone home ere you It was Saturday noon, the 19th arrived, but the Lord has spared of December, when we reached me to meet you once more on earth.” Cuttack. The Brooks's arrived on Then he asked to see Harriet and the following morning. They are gave her a very hearty welcome, staying with the Bond's, and we inquired about her brothers, &c. with our old and valued friends the

You will be sorry to hear Mrs. Buckley's. Long before the day Buckley is not at all strong though

over we had received warm very much better than she was in greetings from all our missionaries, the rains. Except when obliged to and from Mr. and Mrs. Bond, who lay up for a little season, she is are ready to help in every good always up and doing. Miss Guignard

The brethren from Berham- is a great help to her. The latter pore arrived, all looking well, on the is looking, well and seems very 24th. We all spent Christmas-day happy in her work. During the with the Bond's, when twenty-three week she has been with me to nearly adults sat down to dinner. After every house in Lacey Sie, the delightful and social intercourse we largest of our christian villages at closed the day with prayer, and Cuttack. As might be expected singing one of dear Lacey's many alterations have taken place ; favourite bymns beginning,

in many families one or two babies

were exhibited with motherly pride “ Messiah at Thy glad approach." as being added to their household

was

cause.

treasures ; in others I have had to of the new sect, or (as they called listen to tales of woe in reference to it) 'the religion of the sahibs.' dear ones that have been numbered They said this religion of the with the dead.

sahibs is in many respects most On new year's day, a large party excellent and praiseworthy ; but in consisting of the missionaries and two particulars it is greatly to be several pious officers and their despised. In the first place, they wives, took tea with Suddanunda. eat the flesh of the cow, which the A large booth attached to his house shastres say is a davi! (goddess) and tastefully decorated with fruits and secondly, they pay no regard and flowers was prepared for the to caste! the sweeper: the mooccasion. The long table was hammedan and the brahmin are plentifully supplied with rice and quite equal in their estimation! curry, cakes, and a great variety of Their religion is good, for the English viands. Tea was followed worship of the Invisible — SO by worship and a good deal of difficult to understand—they per. singing. The heathen looked on in form; but their conduct with wondering astonishment.

regard to food and caste is worthy to be hated.

Moreover,

those of our countrymen who break EXTRACTS FROM THOMA'S caste and become christians act in JOURNAL.

a like way, paying no further re

gard to either food or custom,' &c., Piplee, July 29, 1862. &c. To these things, I replied,

• My dear brethren, you are quite In a former letter I believe I mistaken in the opinions you en. promised to give you, at a subse- tertain as to the sahibs and the quent date, a brief extract or two native christians. The unlawful from Thoma's journal, relative to food which you accuse the sahibs the late tour in Northern Orissa. of eating, you will, on consideration, I accordingly select the two find to be lawful and proper. God following; from which this much has given these very creatures to be at least will be seen, that our eaten. Moreover, the christian's esteemed brother is no mere hireling shaster says that . The kingdom of -confining his labours to “regular God is not meat and drink, but appointments;" to market days and righteousness, and peace, and joy in visits to bazaars; but that he makes the Holy Ghost.' This is the food exposing error and preaching the too, to which they have been acgospel å life-business, "talking of customed from childhood, and it them when he walks by the way and does not appear in the least imwhen he sits in the house."

proper to them; as, had we been in "February 10, Thursday. Leaving the habit of taking it, it would have Balasore very early in the morning, seemed quite proper even to us. And I proceeded to Khanataparda, where now, if any of us conceive a liking I arrived in time to bathe and eat; for it, there would be no impropriety and after a rest, set out for Sora. in our taking it.* Know, that the On my way I overtook several sahibs do not take and eat the flesh brahmins, and three Mussulmen, of cattle that are diseased, or that with whom, after a few general have died of themselves, or even observations, I began talking about the religion of the Lord Jesus

Many of our christians have a decided Christ. After listening for some objection to eat beef: some wont touch it; time to what I had to say, two of not from any superstitious regard to the cow; the brahmins in particular, who but from the fact that they have never been appeared to have heard much abont in the habit of eating it; they look upon it christianity, began partly to censure upon horse-flesh. Hence the propriety of

with the disgust that an Englishman would and partly to commend the doctrine Thoma's reasoning.

us

Extracts from Thoma's Journal.

119 weakly and lean-fleshed. On the night in the bazaar where I stayed. contrary, the beast is kept up for In the evening I had a lengthy consome time and fed on the best of versation with my mussulmenfellowfood, until full-grown and quite fat. travellers, and with several hindoos, It is then taken and killed, and who had gathered about the door of all the blood taken from it, and our lodging. I spoke of the various thoroughly cleaned; after which it errors of both sects, and showed that is roasted with clarified butter and the system of neither the one nor spices, and a most delicious dish is the other provided for sinful man served up, which is eaten with great an efficient Saviour, but left him to relish and pleasure. And this is perish in his sins : that Jesus what you call the sahibs' akliádya Christ was the 'sent Saviour,' (literally, uneatable) food! Well, and that He only could save if it be uneatable, what are we to from our sins. One of my mussul. say of some of your food? For is men hearers for a time seemed much it not a fact that you brahmins not displeased with what I said; but all only eat the offerings of the Sudea the restappeared edified and pleased. while he is living, but that after he We talked together until a late hour, is dead, you eat his leavings ! and is and when we lay down on our mats not that akliádya food ? * Moreover, to sleep, resumed the conversation. if you do not eat the flesh of the I was much pleased with the conduct cow, you do its milk, yea, and even of my fellow travellers while at my its dung you eat for the resto- private devotions : they sat perfectly ration of caste and for purifying still and never attempted to interrupt purposes ! Why, then, do you so in the least. I should have said too, despise its flesh?' I then tried to that about nine o'clock, I was much show them what was really wrong surprised and gratified to hear a and sinful, and to point them to the mussulman youth of about fourteen, 'Lamb of God who taketh away the singing in the bazaar, part of the sin of the world ;' and thus the Jewel mine of salvation. He began conversation went on for the space at the eighth verse and sang on. of three or four hours, and until we In reply to my query as to where had reached Sora, when the brahmins, he had learned the hymn, he said whose residence was here, after ac- he had been at the government knowledging thatthey could not deny, school, at Bhudruck, and while there what I had said, and that the chris. he received a tract from a book tian religion must be the true one, distributor, (our colporteur, I supwent home; but the mussul- pose,) in which were the sentiments men having to go further the follow he had been singing: that from ing day, took up their abode for the reading the tract over and over

* 1 suppose po people profess to have a again several verses had cleaved to greater disgust for "Ort-eating,” as they his mind." call it, than the hindoos! and in a quarrel After spending the Sabbath at you could not vex a man more by any Khundittur and preaching to the speech than by calling him an Ort-eater. brethren there, on Monday 17th, I Thoma in this remark alludes to the practice of the “family priest”-in proceeded to Barachanna. While every case a brahmin on the death of any stopping at this place to cook and member of the family. For ten days all the eat, I met with several hindoos, members of the family are said to be unclean; and soon got into a deep discussion and on the eleventh day, the house and in about the religion of Jesus Christ. the bramhin cornes and with the use of Several of those present were of the various incantations and charms purifies the Beharer caste, and came from Dhum whole family: He then claims a good portion Nagra, a village near to that of of whatever is in the house, of rice, clothes, Rama Das--our colporteur at Cutvessels, or ought else, said to be the portion tack. It appears they knew Rama, deceased ; and are by bindoos, called the when hewas a heathen; and now began dead's orts."

to speak very reproachfully of our

brother on account of his having nothing for curry, they even shared broken caste, entered the house of what vegetables they had with me! the sahib, sunk his name and the Seeing all this, I felt that the power name of his family, &c., &c. I the gospel exerts over the human allowed them to go on for some time, heart is indeed mighty! and that and then begged they would hear me when preached with fervency and for a little, and having obtained their affection it is able to subdue and consent, I preached unto them humble the stoutest opponent.” Jesus as faithfully and affectionately In justice to my much esteemed as I could ; and, as they had dwelt brother it is but right that I

say

the much on the loss Rama Das had sus- above is very meagre as compared tained, spoke specially of the benefits with the orignal, it seems so prosy the true religion conferred, both in and tame beside the same ideas exthis and the next world, on all those pressed in Oriya.. I hope, however, who embraced it. I finally con- it will not fail to interest the friends cluded by beseeching them to follow of the mission; and then the object the example of their old neighbour : for which it has been translated and for that there was salvation in sent will be fully answered. no other. I was convinced that

GEORGE TAYLOR. what I had said had some effect on their minds, from the very per: ceptible change in their conduct INTELLIGENCE.-A grant of Fifty towards me. At first they treated Pounds has been received from the me with coldness and as an outcast Bible Translation Society to aid in (which they really regarded me to the printing and circulation of be), but afterwards they became the Oriya New Testament. The quite cordial; yea, and actually American and Foreign Bible Society cooked their food in the same house have also voted 500 dollars for the I cooked in, a thing quite contrary same object_to be sent as soon as to their custom! and finding I had the rate of Exchange is lower.

Foreign Letters Received.
CAMP KENDALL.-J. Buckley, Dec. 15. CUTTACK.-Mrs. Stubbins, Jan. 3.
COTTACK.-J. Buckley, Nov. 3, Jan, 3.

-G. Taylor, Dec. 18, Jan. 3.

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