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answer the end for which they have our College. The time for holding been inserted.

Bazaar behalf of this

institution is now drawing Dear Mr. Editor,

near that no time must be lost Yours truly, by any of you that intend to lend April 7, 1863.

W. C. W. a helping hand. I am happy

to know that in he agricultural

districts the College has many OUR COLLEGE BAZAAR. friends. To these I humbly suggest

that they may render very efficient To the Editor of the General Baptist aid by presents from the produce of Magazine.

their dairies, also hams, &c. In a

large manufacturing town there is Dear Sir,-Permit me to remind always a ready sale for these things, the churches through your pages of and thus a section of our friends the Bazaar which is to be held in who are not deep in the mysteries Nottingham for the above named of 'crochet' and · Berlin work,' may object, during the week of the next nevertheless be amongst the most Association. Our friends in this valuable contributors. It would town are very earnestly engaged in impart a pleasing variety to the the preparation of ornamental and Bazaar if the peculiar industries of useful articles, and intimations have various localities were represented been given that in other parts of the for instance, cutlery and its kindred Connexion similar efforts are being articles from Sheffield; toys, and made. I am very anxious, however, fancy papier machie work from Birstill further to solicit liberal mingham ; worsted fancy articles and practical sympathy with the and hosiery from Leicester ; china efforts made by many ladies here. and terra cotta from the potteries, Allow me then to remind your &c., &c. From London (although numerous readers that the time is the centre towards which all the growing short in which articles can products of manufacturing industry be made, and to express my earnest tends) I hardly know what to ask, hope that our Bazaar will be so but as we country cousins' obtain furnished as to prove itself worthy most of our ideas regarding objects of our College and our Denomina- of taste and art from thence, I am tion. The enlarged liberality mani. sanguine that we shall not be disfested in the purchase of our appointed. premises at Chilwell justifies the Yours very sincerely, belief that a work so auspiciously

T. HILL. begun, will be prosecuted in a similar spirit, and warrants the hope I entertain, that the balance of

MINISTERS' FUND £1400 still owing, will then be considerably lessened if not entirely

LANCASHIRE. liquidated. I would only add that it would afford me great pleasure To the Editor of the General Baptist to be informed as early as possible

Magazine. of the assistance for the Bazaar we may hope to receive from different DEAR SIR,—The continued distress churches and friends in the Con- in the cotton districts, renders it nexion.

needful to remind your readers of Yours truly,

the difficult position of our brethren JAMES LEWITT, Sec.

in the ministry, who are still labouring amongst that distressed people

with commendable self-denial and ALLOW me, Mr. Editor. to say a perseverance.

How they are susword or two, to the Friends of tained is a problem which we can.

6

Notices of Books-Replies to Colenso.

183
not solve. The whole amount re- | not complain of continued giving,
ceived by the Committee up to the especially as it is more blessed to give
present time is £113 13s. 6d., of than receive.
this sum £96 has been divided The following sums have been re-
amongst nine churches. Although ceived this month.
this assistance, it must be allowed,

£ s. d.
has been very inadequate to meet Per Rev. T. Goadby, Lon-
the necessities of the case, it has don, 3rd remittance 2 0 0
been very gratefully received, and Ditto, 4th remittance

2 0 0
the hearts of our brethren evidently Mr. H. W. Earp, Mel.
cheered by this manifestation of bourne, 2nd donation 1 0 0
Christian sympathy. Although Mr. J. Earp, ditto

1 0 0 we are aware that the calls of the Post office orders for the object benevolent have been unusually must be made payable to J. Earp, heavy of late, yet I am sure they Treasurer. will agree with me that while we are constantly receiving we should Melbourne, April 13, 1863.

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lotices of Books.

a

The Exodus oF ISRAEL: its difficul- | Israel, very carefully and dispas.

ties examined, and its truth con. sionately takes up the objections
firmed. With a Reply to Recent urged by the Bishop of Natal
Objections. By Rev. T. R. Birks, against the bistorical character of
M.A., London: Religious Tract the books of Moses ; in two, reviews
Society.

the numerical and historical objec

tions, and in the three remaining THE BOOMERANG : or the Bishop of ones, gives the testimony of the

Natal smitten with his own weapon. Psalms, the Prophets, and the By 'A Man of Issachar,' a re- Gospels in favour of their reliability. turned Pilgrim from the East. It would be obviously impossible for An argument and a defence, with us in a brief notice to give a digest a few facts and figures for practi- of the contents of a book numbering cal Englishmen. London: Elliot upwards of 300 pages; and we must Stock.

therefore content ourselves with one The first of these publications is a or two citations, which summarise substantial octavo volume, and the some of the arguments of the author. second is a shilling pamphlet. The Here is one purpose of both is the same: but in the octavo we have fuller dis.

ON THE NUMBER OF THE FIRSTBORN. cussions, and processes as well as results. Bishop Colenso's book may The number of boys in every do harm to some who have just dis- family,' says Colenso, must have covered that there are difficulties been

average, forty-two. in the Books of Moses, but great This will be seen at once, if we general good will result. A closerat- consider that the rest of the 900,000 tention is already being paid to the males were not firstborn, and there. Pentateuch, (and it will bear it,) and fore, each of these must have had men will be led to build their faith one or other of the 22,273 as the on conviction rather than on the firstborn of his own family ; except, most sacred tradition. Mr. Birks, of course, any case where the firstin nineteen out of the two-and-born of any family was a daughter, twenty chapters of his Exodus of or was dead, of which we shall speak

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answer the end for which they have our College. The time for holding been inserted.

Bazaar on behalf of this

institution is drawing Dear Mr. Editor,

near that no time must be lost Yours truly,

by any of you that intend to lend April 7, 1863. W. C. W. a helping hand.

I am happy to know that in the agricultural

districts the College has many OUR COLLEGE BAZAAR. friends. To these I humbly suggest

that they may render very efficient To the Editor of the General Baptist aid by presents from the produce of Magazine.

their dairies, also hams, &c. In a

large manufacturing town there is Dear Sir,-Permit me to remind always a ready sale for these things, the churches through your pages of and thus a section of our friends the Bazaar which is to be held in who are not deep in the mysteries Nottingham for the above named of crochet and Berlin work,' may object, during the week of the next nevertheless be amongst the most Association. Our friends in this valuable contributors. It would town are very earn

rnestly engaged in impart a pleasing variety to the the preparation of ornamental and Bazaar if the peculiar industries of useful articles, and intimations have various localities were represented been given that in other parts of the for instance, cutlery and its kindred Connexion similar efforts are being articles from Sheffield; toys, and made. I am very anxious, however, fancy papier machie work from Birstill further to solicit liberal mingham; worsted fancy articles and practical sympathy with the and hosiery from Leicester ; china efforts made by many ladies here. and terra cotta from the potteries, Allow me then to remind your &c., &c. From London (although numerous readers that the time is the centre towards which all the growing short in which articles can products of manufacturing industry be made, and to express my earnest tends) I hardly know what to ask, hope that our Bazaar will be so

but as we 'country cousins' obtain furnished as to prove itself worthy most of our ideas regarding objects of our College and our Denomina- of taste and art from thence, I am tion. The enlarged liberality mani. sanguine that we shall not be disfested in the purchase of our appointed. premises at Chilwell justifies the Yours very sincerely, belief that a work so auspiciously

T. HILL. begun, will be prosecuted in a similar spirit, and warrants the hope I entertain, that the balance of

MINISTERS' FUND £1400 still owing, will then be considerably lessened if not entirely

LANCASHIRE. liquidated. I would only add that it would afford me great pleasure To the Editor of the General Baptist to be informed as early as possible

Magazine. of the assistance for the Bazaar we may hope to receive from different DEAR SIR,—The continued distress churches and friends in the Con- in the cotton districts, renders it nexion.

needful to remind your readers of Yours truly,

the difficult position of our brethren JAMES LEWITT, Sec.

in the ministry, who are still labour. ing amongst that distressed people

with commendable self-denial and Allow me, Mr. Editor. to say a perseverance. How they are susword or two, to the Friends of tained is a problem whicb we canNotices of BooksReplies to Colenso.

183

not solve. The whole amount re- l not complain of continued giving, ceived by the Committee up to the especially as it is more blessed to give present time is £113 13s. 6d., of than receive. this sum £96 has been divided The following sums have been reamongst nine churches. Although ceived this month. this assistance, it must be allowed,

£ s. d. has been very inadequate to meet Per Rev. T. Goadby, Lon. the necessities of the case, it has don, 3rd remittance 2 0 0 been very gratefully received, and Ditto, 4th remittance 2 0 0 the hearts of our brethren evidently Mr. H. W. Earp, Melcheered by this manifestation of bourne, 2nd donation 1 0 0 Christian sympathy. Although Mr. J. Earp, ditto

1 0 0 we are aware that the calls of the Post office orders for the object benevolent have been unusually must be made payable to J. Earp, heavy of late, yet I am sure they Treasurer. will agree with me that while we are constantly receiving we should Melbourne, April 13, 1863.

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Votices of Books.

6

THE EXODUS OF ISRAEL: its difficul- | Israel, very carefully and dispas.

ties examined, and its truth con- sionately takes up the objections firmed. With a Reply to Recent urged by the Bishop of Natal Objections. By Rev. T. R. Birks, against the historical character of M.A., London: Religious Tract the books of Moses ; in two, reviews Society.

the numerical and historical objec

tions, and in the three remaining THE BOOMERANG : or the Bishop of ones, gives the testimony of the

Natal smitten with his own weapon. Psalms, the Prophets, and the By 'A Man of Issachar,' a re- Gospels in favour of their reliability. turned Pilgrim from the East. It would be obviously impossible for An argument and a defence, with us in a brief notice to give a digest a few facts and figures for practi: of the contents of a book numbering cal Englishmen. London: Elliot upwards of 300 pages, and we must Stock.

therefore content ourselves with one The first of these publications is a or two citations, which summarise substantial octavo volume, and the some of the arguments of the author. second is a shilling pamphlet. The Here is one purpose of both is the same: but in the octavo we have fuller dis

ON THE NUMBER OF THE FIRSTBORN. cussions, and processes as well as results. Bishop Colenso’s book may • The number of boys in every do barm to some who have just dis- family,' says Colenso, 'must have covered that there are difficulties been

average, forty-two. in the Books of Moses, but great This will be seen at once, if we general good will result. A closer at. consider that the rest of the 900,000 tention is already being paid to the males were not firstborn, and there. Pentateuch, (and it will bear it,) and fore, each of these must have had men will be led to build their faith one or other of the 22,273 as the on conviction rather than on the firstborn of his own family ; except, most sacred tradition. Mr. Birks, of course, any case where the firstin nineteen out of the two-and-born of any family was a daughter, twenty chapters of his Exodus of or was dead, of which we shall speak

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presently. So that, according to I firstborn males only, and not of the story of the Pentateuch, every eldest sons, who had an elder sister. mother in Israel must have had on This reduces the number to one-half, an average forty two sons.'

or about seren sons and fire daughters To which Mr. Birks replies: to each family. 5th. Children who * This prodigious result, of forty- died in infancy might be replaced two

and nearly as many by others, but not the firstborn. By daughters for every mother in common tables of life this reduces Israel, is gained by combining three the ratio as 141 to 200, or two-thirds grand errors, one of which triples nearly. Hence, finally, 4; sons, and the number, a second doubles it, probably 3} daughters, or eight boys and a third increases it by one half; and girls together is the total number 80 that their joint effect is to in. required for each Israelite family. crease it just nine-fold. The true This agrees exactly with the rate of result of the actual data is to give increase during the Sojourn, with a a probable number of four and a mean descent or generation, from half sons and three and a half father to son, of 31 or 32 years. daughters, or a total of eight boys The objection, then, turns into a and girls in each family. This may fresh confirmation of the consistency be shown briefly by the following and truth of the whole narrative.' reasons. 1st. The basis of the judg- We have only room for another ment on Egypt, and the consecra- quotation. It is on tion of the firstborn was the relation of Israel to Jehovah as a firstborn THE FIRST PASSOVER IN EGYPT. child, under the tutelage of his father. When Israel was a child, • The whole of the immense popu. then I loved him, and called my son lation of Israel,' says Colenso, . as out of Egypt. Hosea xi. 1. 2nd. large as that of London, was inThe judgment on Egypt, for the structed to keep the Passover, and denial of God's paternal right over actually did keep it, in one single day. Israel, was strictly a domestic visit. For the first notice of it contains ation, not on the adult Egyptians, the words, I will pass through the but on the eldest male child in each land of Egypt this night, verse 12. family, the chief of all their strength, It cannot be said that this only Psalms cv., 36. So that in every means, on the night of the fourteenth house there was one dead, Exodus of Nisan; because the word is this xii., 30. That one was the eldest and not that ; and it is said again, son, and not the householder or verse 14, THIS DAY shall be unto you parent, else Pharoah himself, in all for a memorial. It is true the story sikelihood, must have perished also. as it now stands, with its directions 3rd. The consecration of Israel about taking and keeping the lamb, answered strictly to the judgment are perplexing and contradictory; on Egypt. The Passover was cele- but this is only one of the many brated in each house, and it was a similar phenomena of these books domestic deliverance. Only after of the Pentateuch. the sons of Israel themselves have Again, the Passover would rebeen numbered, or all the adult quire 150,000 lambs of the first year males, the further charge is given, for sacrifices. But 50,000 he-lambs Number all the firstborn males to the besides must be kept for breeding, sons of Israel, from a month old and or else there would never be any upward ; that is, all the firstborn rams or wethers, but ewe sheep in. children, who were males, to the numerable ! This implies 400,000 parents who have been numbered lambs of the first year, and flocks just before. Thus the number is reduced of two millions, and 400,000 acres, to one-third, or fourteen sons, and or 625 square miles of pasture. fourteen,or more probably ten daughters. Over this space the Israelites must 4th. The numbering was of the have been spread when they re

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