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The Ware ! the Wave! It is coming!

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can, said Cross; by crossing the mill sluice. "We are lost,' said the rock we may yet be in time.' He girl ; 'I cannot cross; it will carry looked rather pale as he spoke, and me away.' Hope seeing his alarm hastened to 'Is it deep?' said Cross. “Not follow him. For the moment Cross very,' she said; but it is too strong.' ceased speaking.. He scrambled up Cross lifted the girl in his arms the rocks, and began walking as he was a strong big man and rapidly as he could across them plunged into the stream, which was toward the nearest shore. But the up to his waist. With a few strides pace was necessarily slow. The he was across, and set the girl down. ground was rough and slippery He then held on by the rock, and with the dank sea-weed. Crevices stretched out his hand to Hope, who that half an hour before were a was following like an experienced source of amusement, now served wader, taking very short steps, and still further to retard their progress. with his legs well stretched out, to At last they reached the highest prevent being swept away by the point they could see before them. force of the water. Hope grasped * Thank God, said Cross, the sand is the hand thus held out to him, and not yet covered, but we must run for in another second the two friends it. They hastened on, and in three were standing beside the girl. minutes more they were at the edge • That is tremendous,' said Hope ; of the sand, but they now saw that 'if I had not seen it, I never could the sand was in stripes and the have believed it.' water in sheets. They had pro

'It is indeed,' said Cross, and in ceeded thus for about two hundred winter, or in blowing weather, the yards when they saw the little girl tide wave comes in with far greater from whom Hope had bought some force than this we have just seen.' crabs, that day, very dearly, as Cross • Come on, come on,' cried the thought, for the fisher-girls, like the girl. 'Holy Virgin! we are nearly rest of the Normans, ask generally lost!' three times as much as the thing is The little girl again led the way to worth, and as they mean to take, the high point of the lighter-colored and Hope had really given her what rock which had attracted the attenshe asked. She now came hastily tion of Hope in the morning. When toward them, and was calling out they had reached it, she said, “We something which they could not are safe now;' and pulling from her catch, for the girl was out of breath. breast a string of beads with a When she came quite close up to crucifix, she began to tell the beads. them they caught the words. «The The two friends looked on in silence. wave! the wave! it is coming Perhaps they too were returning turn, turn, and run, or we are lost!' thanks to heaven, although they

They did turn and they saw far held no beads in their hands. out to sea a large wave rolling After a few minutes thus spent, towards the shore. They at once the girl looked up and smiled at retraced their steps to the rock they Cross. . Thank you,' she said, 'for had just left. The little girl passed lifting me over. I could not have them and led the way. The wave crossed myself; and she continued, still rolled toward them—the sand the second wave has come, and it is was getting covered, and their knees all water now.' were now buried in the rising tide. The friends looked. All around

Quick! quick !' said the girl; them was the wide sea. They were 'there is the passage to cross, and if on an island which each moment the second wave comes, we shall be became less; and this island was too late.' She ran on for a hundred three quarters of a mile from the yards till she came to a crack in the shore. rock, six or seven feet wide, along 'I am afraid, Sir, you will be cold,' which the water was rushing like a said the little girl. We are quite

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safe here, for this point is always her oysters, and that the bread for above the water except in a storm; my mother was on the grass. I rebut we shall have to remain here membered the oysters when I had three or four hours before we can go run a good way. They are heavy, to the shore.'

and I wished I had left them, for I • Cold or hot,' said Cross, we could not run so fast with them on may be thankful we are here. But my back.' what made you forget the tide, for • She is a brave little thing,' said you must know the coast so well?' Cross, and shews she has presence

'I did not forget it,' she said, of mind to see, and promptitude to but feared you would be drowned, act. She shall have all the money as you were strangers, and I thought in my pocket.' I should be in time to tell you, but * And in mine too,' said Hope, I was too late, and the wave came. 'but it is not much, and we must do

. And did you risk your life to something more for her. I wonder save us ?' said Hope, the tear start- what she would most like in all the ing in his eyes.

world.' I thought at any rate I should Ask her,' said Cross. Hope did get here,' she replied. As you are • To have a dress,' she said, strangers you would not know that to wear when I go to mass, just like it is always dry here, and on the the one Angela's sister had on last strand you would be lost; so I came Sunday, with a beautiful silver cruto help you, for the gentleman was cifix like hers.' kind, and gave me a good price for •You shall have it,' said botla my crabs; so I hoped I should be in friends together. Hope wished she time to warn you; but I was very had asked something else than dress, nearly too late.'

and Cross replied, Though she is Hope took the little girl in his a little heroine, still she is French, arms and kissed her. Never say a and therefore a slave to finery; and word against a Granvillaise again as yet, poor thing, she is lightly enough long as you live, he said in English clad just now to make her covet to Cross, "for this child shows something to wear. She must be that they are brave and generous. cold. Are you ? · Yes, she replied ; If they drive a hard bargain, I am a little, for I am hungry.' you see they are grateful, instead of 'And I have left my sandwich box laughing at their customers, and for in the carriage,' said Hope. • Have this little creature's sake I shall love you your flask?' said Cross. Hope and respect them even if they do bully felt, and to his joy found that it their husbands ;' then speaking in was in his pocket. Cross brought French to the girl, he continued, out half a dozen Jersey biscuits • We owe you our lives, you brave from his breast pocket; and countlittle creature ; and so I thank you ing Angela's oysters, asked the little in the meantime, and hope to do girl if she had her knife. more hereafter. But how came you “Yes Sir,' she said, and held up a to know we were here ?!

coarse square-headed clasp knife “I took your crabs to the inn, covered with rust; as well it might and the burgeois gave me some bread be, for it was hanging to her side by for the rest I had in my basket. As a string, and had been trailing for I came back I met Angela on the many a day in the sea. hill. She was tired, and she asked By the aid of the oysters and the me to carry some of her oysters; biscuits and the flask, ten minutes and while I was dividing them be- were passed pleasantly enough, when tween her basket and mine I saw Cross noted that the tide was still you below. I knew it must be you, rising, and inch by inch narrowing for only strangers would stay so their territory. If the tide rises long here at spring tides. I ran much more,' said he, 'we shall have away at once, and forgot that I had to swim for it yet.'

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wave came.

Though he spoke in English the "We must not let Angela be girl understood by his eye that he jealous,' said Cross; "for she is to was speaking of the tide, and added: tell us where her sister got her *There is no fear; even if the water smart dress. This gentleman and reaches us; it has no force now, and I have promised that you shall have the points of the rocks are always one like it; so you must bring dry.

Angela to see us to-morrow, that Cold comfort,' said Hope, looking we may give her a handkerchief at the small sharp-pointed rocks also in payment for the oysters, and that rose about a couple of feet above then she will help us to get the where they were standing, and were dress we have promised.' just high enough to afford shelter O happy day! happy day!' she from the wind, which they now felt said, clapping her hands : • Angela to be cold enough. Their island, will be so pleased.' however, was still about twenty 'If-we get-ashore'-said Hope; yards across; the tide was rising for a wave at that moment rolled more slowly, but it was rising. The past, and the water began to run food and brandy had warmed the along the little platform upon which men, but the little girl had refused the they were sitting. They all rose at brandy and now looked very cold. once, and mounting on to the rocky She was trying to give another turn points, clung to each other. Another to the ragged black silk handker

It appeared only like chief which she wore round her a ripple, but when they looked down neck. The two francs which Hope the water was a foot deep where had given her for the crabs, and they had been previously sitting. which had excited her gratitude and There was silence for a while. saved their lives, were tied in one Another wave came. The water corner ; but through the worn silk was within six inches of their feet. the money was plainly visible.

'It is a terrible high tide,' said Hope gave the girl a silk pocket the girl; but if we hold together, handkerchief to put round her neck, we shall not be washed away.' but she seemed afraid lest it should That is true,' said Cross ; ' as we be spoiled. “No it will not,' said are wet already, we need not much Cross; 'the gentleman gives it you, care.' so you will take care of it.' Then Hope's face was toward the shore. speaking in English, he said to Hope, • There are a great many people

As the corner of their handkerchief clustering on the poịnt,' he said. is always their purse, we may as • It is always a comfort to know that well club what money we have to our fellow-beings are taking an furnish the one you have given her; interest in us, and I suppose

those the idea of her riches will do more people are watching us. to warm her than dry clothes and a The little girl turned to look. A fire.'

faint sound of a cheer was heard, The friends clubbed together, and and they could see the people on the amount proved to be forty shore waving their hats and handfrancs, which they tied in the corner kerchiefs. • They think the tide of the handkerchief. The girl has turned,' she said, 'and they are watched the proceeding, and when shouting to cheer us.' Hope passed it round her neck, she She was right. The tide had blushed with delight, and kissed turned. Another wave came and both their hands, and repeated wet their feet; but when it had several times- 'How beautiful ! passed, the water had fallen, and in how generous ! how kind you are to five minutes more the platform was give me so much! And after looking again dry ! at her treasures for a while she •Grâce à Dieu !' said the girl, said, 'How jealous Angela will be, descending to their old station. 'I and how happy my mother!' was frightened; were not you ??

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The light now began to wane. | stumbles, but at length they perTheir eyes were turned to the shore, ceived that the lights were ad. for all their hopes were fixed in that vancing to them. They stepped on, direction. Five minutes after they the water plashing at every stride, had reached the platform, they saw but getting increasingly shallow. the large group of people disperse Another stride, and they stand on from the high point where they had the dry ground beside the party been collected. A few now only re- with lanterns, which consisted of an mained on this elevated station; the old woman, a tall handsome girl, rest were collected in small groups, and a young man; several other each group being at some little young men and girls were following: distance from the other. The fisher. The old woman, the mother of girl explained that these were the Matilde, as soon as the party from several places of the dealers in fish. the island came within range of the

While the Englishmen were discuss- light, ran forward and embraced ing the possibility of turning the im. her tenderly, and then put down her mense shoals of fish on the coast of lantern, cried bitterly, and ended Scotland into a source of profit to the by scolding her like a pickpocket. people along the shore, Cross said The French friends at the inn who

See, there is one of your friends, had been waiting for dinner several a spider-crab. He has come out of hours, had to wait still longer while the tide, and is now employed in Hope had a hot foot-bath, which scraping our oyster shells. This the landlady extemporised out of a led to a discussion on the ways of large brass pot. Matilde and her spider-crabs in general, and to their relatives shared in the dinner by carnivorous tastes.

universal consent. The cold was increasing, and The next morning the English Cross proposed a run to warm them- naturalists tasted the luxury of selves. But Hope could scarcely giving pleasure. The small garden crawl from benumbed limbs. The that lay next to the house where little girl, whose name they now Matilde's mother lived was for sale, learnt was Matilde, assured them and to be had for fifty francs—six that there would be no safety in pounds, English. The two friends attempting to leave their island at once determined to purchase it until the back wave had come, that for their brave little companion on the back wave had not come yet, the rock. The business was done and till then the island must be with a rapidity unknown in England. their home. The darkness now By a little after ten the next morn. settled upon the waters—and the ing everything was ready. The shore became invisible. They could garden purchased, the dress bought, see the line of the high promontory and the handkerchief. against the western sky, and pres- The old woman and the two girls ently lights were moving about on arrived. Cross made a short laudathe shore. “See! there are lanterns,'tory speech in honour of their little said the little girl; “they are coming friends bravery and presence of to guide us.' The three lights they mind. saw coming down the hill stopped At first she did not understand at the shore.

what was done. She only knew The party, again under the guid- that she had been praised, and had ance of Matilde, now advance received some bits of paper. She toward the shore. The creek over therefore smiled and blushed. But which Cross had carried Matilde was when it was explained to her that still full of swift running water, but she was a landed proprietor—that shallower and more easily fordable. the garden she had bi rto assisted They crossed, still wading up to to till was now her own, and that their knees. The rough rocks her mother must now pay rent to beneath the water caused many | her and no one else--then indeed

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she became wild with delight. She said to Cross; 'tell them to get laughed, wept, danced, and clapped their breakfast, and to make the her hands-asked every one if it notary explain anything they may was not too wonderful to be true, wish to know. Let us be off, at any and darting off, she seized the hands rate. I should like to go as far as of her benefactors, and pressed them the headland, and see our last night's alternately to her lips, saying over post from thence.' Hope turned and over again, 'How good! how away, and Cross did as he was regenerous ! how magnificent you quested, and followed the moment have been to me!'

after. The two friends walked Hope had not been long enough gently on for some little time in on the Continent to relish having silence. his hand kissed: he withdrew it * Well, Cross,' said Hope, break. from her grasp, stooped down, and ing this silence, 'my worm-hunting pressed his lips to her forehead. got us into this scrape, and has cost Cross took the hand-kissing, more us five pounds a piece. I do not as a matter of course ; but he too regret it, and I hope you do not embraced the little girl as Hope either. What a pleasure it is to had done, and then gave his hand make others so happy, and so easily ! to her mother, who first kissed her To me the sight of that little girl's own, as a Highland peasant does, delight was worth five times the and then pressed alternately the money.' hands of the two Englishmen.

‘And to me also,' said Cross, Angela did the same, saying as 'and yet if one thinks of it, it she did so, 'You are good and ought to make us sad and ashamed; generous; but Matilde deserves it.' for what sums have I wasted in As for the mother, all her volubility folly that might have made hundreds was gone.

She only once said as happy as she is now!' May heaven bless you both.'

* Dont let us think of that,' said A crowd began to gather. It is Hope ; 'my present pleasure is too wonderful how news flies in a small great to allow me to look back on so place. Hope bated a public scene, sad a remembrance. Let the lesson more especially as he felt now half be a guide for the future, not a inclined to weep. 'Come away,' he' punishment for the past.'

THE BRITISH COLONIES.

GREAT Britain is the largest colonizer ' than two hundred and fifty ycars of modern times. The countries ago.

A century later the Indian which have been gained by settle- commerce had greatly extended, ment, by cession, or by conquest, and two companies trading with have been mostly retained. While, India were consolidated. After the therefore, the area of the British lapse of another century, when Isles may look small on the map of Tippoo Saheb had been defeated, Europe, the British Empire has now British India was extended in the become one of the most extensive in north to Rohilcund and Doab, and the world. Let us look briefly at some in the south to Tanjore and Malabar; particulars illustrative of the rapid within twenty years, Delhi, Agra, growth and present position of our and the Mahratta districts were British Colonies.

annexed; and in the present century, England's vast empire in India Scinde, the Punjab, and Oude. had its origin in a single factory at The first British settlement in Surat, which was established more Africa was formed on the Gambia

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