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How Grizzy got her Dream Read.

295

was

afforded us a breathing time, and a resolved to remain another day in great relief from the choking drift. our covert from the storm. While we sat here, as thankful as Gilbert listened thus far with deep ever Jonah did under his gourd, a interest to the story of the strangers hare or fox sprang out between us, from Carsphairn, and then eagerly apparently from some recess behind; asked — But where did your breakon looking for which, we found an fast come from? How did you get opening, which we entered, and on for food ?' found within a spacious apartment, 'Here,' said they, 'we were not with the floor as dry as dust, and altogether at a loss. We had a good sheltered altogether from the wind. stock of bread and cheese in our We struck a light, and kindled a pockets when we left home, which piece of paper, and held it up as a was now only half exhausted ; and torch, and found thatwe were under a as we passed through the moors, a strongly-built arch of someold tower, friendly woman, in whose hut we where we might remain in safety, at rested for a few minutes, presented least for one night. Finding on the each of us with a goodly bottle of floor a quantity of brushwood and milk, fresh from the cow. This gift tufts of dried heather, we kindled a of unspeakable value, for fire, and comforted ourselves with we know not what we should its warmth. We next discovered have done in the vault without several stone seats placed by the wall something to slake our thirst. We round the vault. We drew our fire spent the day in no little comfort: toward them, and felt happy. Not a but the thought began to haunt us, few of our companions, we knew, were that probably the storm would conshivering in dripping caves on the tinue, and then this vaultmust become sides of the hills, and we were pro- our sepulchre. It was this which tected from damp and wind. The prompted us on the second morning smoke did not annoy us, for it went of our residence here, to issue from straight out of the hole at which our retreat, and look abroad on the entered. Our hearts rose in thanks- face of the moorland, if possible to giving to the great Preserver of our descry a human habitation. We set lives who had so wondrously guided out with the storm in our teeth, and our steps to such a retreat. Having found that the snow was already prayed together, we wrapped our- more than three feet deep, and that selves in our plaids and fell asleep, the drift was still streaming along and scarcely woke till the morning without abatement. After wanderbegan to peep in at the entrance to ing about without success we began the vault. We roused ourselves to think of returning, and then the and proceeded to collect materials thought was suggested that perhaps for a fire, and soon the whole ex- our footprints would lead to our terior was lighted up with a cheerful detection. We re-entered the vault blaze.

full of forebodings; and to fortify But now a new difficulty pre our confidence in God we fell on our sented itself. The smoke did not knees and prayed. We committed seem to escape, but collected in a ourselves to Him who had cared for dense suffocating cloud above our us thus far, and asked if it were His head. We ran to the entrance for will, for deliverance. We arose breath, and found that it was all filled refreshed and confident, and had with snow, excepting a small space scarcely seated ourselves on the near the upper part, which could stone chairs again when we observed scarcely admit a man's arm. We a dark shadow at the mouth of the began to clear the aperture, and with vault, and heard a voice asking, difficulty forced our way to the 'Is there anybody here ?' 'You know outside. No sooner had we opened the rest.' the mouth of the vault than Weel,' exclaimed Grizzy, 'I ha’e the smoke rushed out, and we were I gotton my dream read. I dreamed

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that twa o' our sheep had wandered / and hungry strangers partook of a frae' the lave, and that some o' the plentiful meal and were refreshed. dragoons, passing through the moor, Willie then answered the strangers' huntit their cruel dogs at the twa enquiries as to the reason of their puir things, till, bleetin, and for- search, and they at once exclaimed, fochip they escaped into the auld vowt, The Lord is wonderful in working and the dogs foregatherin wi' a in reply to the supplications of this hare, ran after it; and sae ye're people in the hour of their distress. welcome here for our Master's sake, We are a witnessing remnant, andwe in whose cause ye suffer.'

may look for some special inter.' Gilbert's joy knew no bounds at position on our behalf.' finding himself in the company of But the affairs of honest Gilbert such men, to whom it was in his were needing attention. The sheep power and in his heart to do a had been dug out of the snow it is service. 'It's just ae wonder after true; but they were still in a another,' said he. 'Ye were heard perilous condition on a knoll near in being directed to the vault, and the house, and as the storm did not ye were heard when praying in the abate, it was necessary that they vault. What a Master we serve! should be cared for. A large out0! if we had only a minister wi' house, frail indeed both in its walls us, what a happy time we might and roof, was selected as a shelter spend.'

for the poor sheep. Into this place *Hoot awa,' Gibby, my man, they were collected, and furnished said Grizzy, 'we mauna fa' that. with plenty of hay. And now the I think ye hae here men wi' ye that minds of all were greatly at easemay weel serve in the stead o' ony Gilbert's property was secured, and minister, even o Saunders him in this the men rejoiced: the men's sel, although there is naebody I lives were spared, and this gave like better to see dit our door than Gilbert and" Grizzy unspeakable Saunders Peden, for he aye brings delight. his Master wi' him. Ye hae a' the The work of digging out the company ye’ill get as lang, as this sheep from the snow and of prestorm lasts, and let us be thankful paring them shelter in the outhouse for what we have.'

was no great task for these stalwart While Grizzy was talking she was men; but a work was before them preparing a hearty breakfast of which they could not foresee, and warm, rich brose—the common food which would tax their energies to of those times—and the two cold | the utmost.

FOSTER ON THE IMPROVEMENT OF TIME.*

This is one of the earliest of Foster's essays were written which had alproductions. In 1805 he told a ready established his fame. By friend that the subject suited him and bye there arose the necessity for well, and that he hoped to finish the some quicker return than could writing of the essay upon it by the be obtained from the publication of end of the year, The end of the an independent work, and he had year came, but did not bring with become one of the chief contributors it the end of the essay. Foster found to the Eclectic. It thus happened by that time that its composition that notwithstanding the importunity had become slow, tedious, and of friends, and some pressure from disagreeable. The subject had lost the booksellers, the essay on the its charm, or rather, as the Editor Improvement of_Time was not pub. suggests, Foster lacked the inspira- lished during Foster's lifetime. It tion under which the four celebrated

* London: Heaton and Son.

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How to Estimate the Value of Time.

297 now first sees the light twenty years would be useful; but generally, as after his death.

in his case, the effect alone of the The dissenting public have reason whole is retained, rather than any to congratulate themselves on its exact recollection of them. He appearance. We have not so many felt his chief difficulty in writing eminent names in literature that the essay to be, the tendency we can afford to let one die. What to make his treatise mere ever defects the author of this lecture on general morals. He treatise might have, he earned for however proposes to treat his himself a place among the writers subject not much philosoof his day as John Foster, the phically as morally and practically. Essayist; and the publication of This should be distinctly borne in this posthumous work will do some mind. thing to recall attention to one who The first part is divided into four was as distinguished for his origin- chapters, which take up successively ality as he was for his conscientious- the value, the capacity and swiftness ness. In our judgment it will of time, and the ultimate object of rather extend tha lessen his fame. its improvement.

Its value may Bearing throughout traces of that be estimated by what is actually earlier manner which it is to be accomplished in a given portion regretted he ever renounced, it of it, say in the space of a single contains also many passages equal hour, or a single day. In opening to any to be found in his later pro- up this thought, he says: The ductions. Its appeals to the con- Omnipresent Spirit perceives all science are neither rhapsodical nor but an infinite number of actions untimely, and cannot fail to touch taking place together throughto the quick those who give them a out the different regions of His careful examination. The Baptist empire. And by the end of the body, and indeed the Christian pub- hour which has just now begun a lic generally, are greatly endebted greater number of operations will to the publishers for exhuming this have been performed, which at this treatise from its almost forgotten moment have not been performed, sepulchre; and the readers of this than the collective sum of all that volume will find themselves largely has been done in this world since under obligation to the Editor for its creation. The hour just now the admirable manner in which he begun may be exactly the period for has executed the work entrusted to finishing some great plan, or conhim.

cluding some great dispensation The essay begins by touching which thousands of years or ages upon some of those reasons which have been advancing to its accomFoster thinks have hitherto pre- plishment. This may be the very vented any one from undertaking a hour in which a new world shall formal treatise on the improvement originate or an ancient one sink of time. This has arisen partly in ruins. At this hour, such from the facility and necessity of changes and phenomena may be disintroducing it as a relative topic in played in some part of the universe aid of almost all other subjects of as never presented to the instructive writing. Writers have astonishment of the most ancient been sensible of having too liberally created minds. At this very hour, expended the materials belonging to the inhabitants of some remote orb the subject, among the diversity of may be roused by signs analogous their moral arguments, to leave to those which we anticipate to preenough for a separate consideration cede the final judgment, and in order of it. Many passages bearing upon to prepare them for such an event. the topic may be found scattered | This hour may somewhere begin or through the writings of others, and conclude mightier contests than a compilation of them Foster thinks | Milton was able to imagine, and

were

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that twa o' our sheep had wandered / and hungry strangers partook of a frae' the lave, and that some o' the plentiful meal and were refreshed. dragoons, passing through the moor, Willie then answered the strangers' huntit their cruel dogs at the twa enquiries as to the reason of their puir things, till, bleetin, and for- search, and they at once exclaimed, fochip they escaped into the auld vowt, The Lord is wonderful in working and the dogs foregatherin wi' a in reply to the supplications of this hare, ran after it; and sae ye’re people in the hour of their distress. welcome here for our Master's sake, | We are a witnessing remnant, and we in whose cause ye suffer.'

may look for some special inter.' Gilbert's joy knew no bounds at position on our behalf.' finding himself in the company of But the affairs of honest Gilbert such men, to whom it was in his were needing attention. The sheep power and in his heart to do a had been dug out of the snow it is service. It's just ae wonder after true; but they were still in a another,' said he. 'Ye were heard perilous condition on a knoll near in being directed to the vault, and the house, and as the storm did not ye were heard when praying in the abate, it was necessary that they vault. What a Master we serve! should be cared for. A large out0! if we had only a minister wi' house, frail indeed both in its walls us, what a happy time we might and roof, was selected as a shelter spend.'

for the poor sheep. Into this place *Hoot awa,' Gibby, my man, they were collected, and furnished said Grizzy, 'we mauna fa' that. with plenty of hay. And now the I think ye hae here men wi' ye that minds of all were greatly at easemay weel serve in the stead o'ony Gilbert's property was secured, and minister, even o' Saunders him in this the men rejoiced: the men's sel, although there is naebody I lives were spared, and this gave like better to see dit our door than Gilbert and" Grizzy unspeakable Saunders Peden, for he aye brings delight. his Master wi' him. Ye hae a' the The work of digging out the company ye’ill get as lang as this sheep from the snow and of prestorm lasts, and let us be thankful paring them shelter in the outhouse for what we have.'

was no great task for these stalwart While Grizzy was talking she was men; but a work was before them preparing a hearty breakfast of which they could not foresee, and warm, rich brose—the common food which would tax their energies to of those times and the two cold | the utmost.

FOSTER ON THE IMPROVEMENT OF TIME.*

This is one of the earliest of Foster's | essays were written which had al. productions. In 1805 he told a ready established his fame.

By friend that the subject suited him and bye there arose the necessity for well, and that he hoped to finish the some quicker return than could writing of the essay upon it by the be obtained from the publication of end of the year. The end of the an independent work, and he had year came, but did not bring with become one of the chief contributors it the end of the essay. Foster found to the Eclectic. It thus happened by that time that its composition that notwithstanding the importunity had become slow, tedious, and of friends, and some pressure from disagreeable. The subject had lost the booksellers, the essay on the its charm, or rather, as the Editor Improvement of Time was not pubsuggests, Foster lacked the inspira- lished during Foster's lifetime. It tion under which the four celebrated

* London: Heaton and Son.

How to Estimate the Value of Time.

297

a

[ocr errors]

now first sees the light twenty years I would be useful; but generally, as after his death.

in his case, the effect alone of the The dissenting public have reason whole is retained, rather than any to congratulate themselves on its exact recollection of them. He appearance. We have not so many felt his chief difficulty in writing eminent names in literature that the essay to be, the tendency we can afford to let one die. What to make his treatise mere ever defects the author of this lecture on general morals. He treatise might have, he earned for however proposes to treat his himself a place among the writers subject not much philosoof his day as John Foster, the phically as morally and practically. Essayist; and the publication of This should be distinctly borne in this posthumous work will do some mind. thing to recall attention to one who The first part is divided into four was as distinguished for his origin. chapters, which take up successively ality as he was for his conscientious- the value, the capacity and swiftness negs. In our judgment it will of time, and the ultimate object of rather extend than lessen his fame. its improvement.

Its value may Bearing throughout traces of that be estimated by what is actually earlier manner which it is to be accomplished in a given portion regretted he ever renounced, it of it, say in the space of a single contains also many passages equal hour, or a single day. In opening to any to be found in his later pro- up this thought, he says: The ductions. Its appeals to the con- Omnipresent Spirit perceives all science are neither rhapsodical nor but an infinite number of actions untimely, and cannot fail to touch taking place together throughto the quick those who give them a out the different regions of His careful examination. The Baptist empire. And by the end of the body, and indeed the Christian pub- hour which has just now begun a lic generally, are greatly endebted greater number of operations will to the publishers for exhuming this have been performed, which at this treatise from its almost forgotten moment have not been performed, sepulchre; and the readers of this than the collective sum of all that volume will find themselves largely has been done in this world since under obligation to the Editor for its creation. The hour just now the admirable manner in which he begun may be exactly the period for has executed the work entrusted to finishing some great plan, or conhim.

cluding some great dispensation The essay begins by touching which thousands of years or ages upon some of those reasons which have been advancing to its accomFoster thinks have hitherto pre- plishment. This may be the very vented any one from undertaking a hour in which a new world shall formal treatise on the improvement originate or an ancient one sink of time. This has arisen partly in ruins. At this hour, such from the facility and necessity of changes and phenomena may be disintroducing it as a relative topic in played in some part of the universe aid of almost all other subjects of as never presented to the instructive writing. Writers have astonishment of the most ancient been sensible of having too liberally created minds. At this very hour, expended the materials belonging to the inhabitants of some remote orb the subject, among the diversity of may be roused by signs analogous their moral arguments, to leave to those which we anticipate to preenough for a separate consideration cede the final judgment, and in order of it. Many passages bearing upon to prepare them for such an event. the topic may be found scattered This bour may somewhere begin or through the writings of others, and conclude mightier contests than a compilation of them Foster thinks | Milton was able to imagine, and

were

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