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CLERICAL BIGOTRY IN THE NINE- ment establishments, where the TEENTH CENTURY.-It can scarcely officials are paid by the State from be believed in these enlightened funds compulsorily levied, those days, that a clergyman could be officials should be members of the found who would refuse to read the Established Church. He had no burial service over the body of a hesitation in saying that the properson who had been in the habit of ceedings of this young man were attending the church, and the Sab. not what an officer of such an estabbath-school connected with it, just lishment ought to do.' Mr. Henry because the rites of baptism had Hudson, who was, perhaps, the not been performed. Yet such only Dissenter on the bench, rewas the case recently. A daughter marked that this was the first time of a respectable farmer died at he had ever heard that a gaol was a Newton Ferrers, and the body was strictly Church-of-England comtaken to Yealampton churchyard for munity. The only complaint against interment, when, to the surprise of the schoolmaster really was, that he the friends, the minister stated that read the prayers of the English he had received instructions from a Church. There was no imputation brother clergyman residing near whatever on his ability or character, him that he was not to read the and he was sorry that in the nineburial service over the body for the teenth century such a question reason stated above. The friends should have been brought before remonstrated with him, but to no them. The Earl of Dudley, the purpose, so the body was lowered into chairman, here put a stop to the the grave and covered over without discussion as irregular. The magisthe service being read.

trates had, he said, at the time THE WORCESTERSHIRE MAGISTRATES made the best possible appointment. AND A BAPTIST SCHOOLMASTER.–At The subject then dropped; but the the last Worcestershire Quarter unfortunate schoolmaster has since Sessions, the Rev. G. R. Gray, of been called upon to send in his re. Inkberrow, called the attention of signation. Had the bench consisted the bench to the astounding fact of laymen only, however high their that the schoolmaster in the county Churchmanship, they could not have gaol was a Baptist, and that after been guilty of such a contemptible attending the Church service at the piece of bigotry and meanness; but gaol on a Sunday morning, he the clerical magistrates lead their actually went to a Baptist chapel in fellows through the dirtiest sloughs the evening! 'At one part of the and deepest puddles they can find. day he expressed his belief in one ANOTHER CASE OF REMARRIAGE. Holy Catholic Church, and one In The Chronicle of the 15th of baptism for the remission of sins, August last, the following appeared and at another the reverse. He in the list of marriages :-. On the (Mr. Gray) had always thought the 9th inst., at the Wesleyan chapel, three leading officers of the gaol— Leigh, by the Rev. William Moore, the governor, the chaplain, and the Mr. Thomas Bramhall, of Penning. schoolmaster-should be members ton, to Miss Agnes Farrington, of the Church of England.' Other Westleigh.' The young woman had magistrates having concurred with for some time previous to her Mr. Gray in regarding the appoint- marriage resided with her parents ment as most heinous, Lord Lyttels near St. Paul's Church, Westleigh, ton also, though he did not know at which place she was a Sundaywhat to say about turning out the scholar, her parents attending that young man after he had held the church. Owing, however, to some place three years, yet 'must express family differences, she left her home, his surprise that such an appoint- and went to reside in Jones's-row, ment had been made. He under. Pennington, during which period stood that in all public and Govern- she attended the Baptist Union Intelligence-Miscellaneous.

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Sunday-school, at the Town Hall, | Lichfield, Llandaff, Gloucester and and continued to attend her class Bristol, Lord Lyttelton, the Speaker, there after her marriage. A short Mr. Walpole, Drs. Jacobson and time ago the couple removed to Jeremie,--takes the general super. Westleigh, and have been residing vision of the work. The Rev. F. near to the young woman's parents. C. Cook, preacher at Lincoln’s-inn, They have been induced to attend will be the general editor, and will church again, and upon the curate advise with the Archbishop of York (the Rev. A. Wood) making inquiries and the Regius Professors of as to where she had attended during Divinity at Oxford and Cambridge her absence from Westleigh, was upon any questions which may arise. informed of all the circumstances, The work will be divided into eight including her marriage at the sections, the first of which will Wesleyan chapel. These proceed consist of the Pentateuch, a difficult ings appear to have met with the subject, and will be edited by Procensure of the curate, who de fessor Harold Brown, the Revs. R. nounced it as no better than a c. Pascoe, T. F. Thrupp, T. E. heathen marriage,' and told the Espin, and W. Dewhurst contributyoung couple they were not lawfully ing. The historical books will be married. He has induced them to consigned to the Rev. G. Rawlinson, be re-married, promising that he editor, and the Revs. T. E. Espin would exact no fees, and that he and Lord Arthur Hervey, contribu. would give them their marriage tors. The Rev. F. C. Cook will lines. The second ceremony was edit, and the Revs. E. H. Plumptre, performed at the parish church, by W. T. Bullock, and T. Kingsbury the Rev. A. Wood, and in the will annotate, the poetical books. presence of the young woman's The four Great Prophets will be parents.

undertaken by Dr. M'Caul as editor, • AUTHORISED' COMMENTARY ON THE and by the Revs. R. Payne Smith BIBLE.—The Guardian says, we are and H. Rose as contributors. The happy to see that the objections Bishop of St. David's and the Rev. brought against certain portions of R. Gandell will edit the twelve the Bible are about to be met by Minor Prophets, and the Revs. E. leading theologians of the Church Huxtable, W. Drake, and F. Mey. of England in a very practical way. rick will contribute. The Gospels If a false and unfair system of in- and Acts will form the sixth section; terpretation has been applied to the the first three Gospels will be edited text of Scripture, the best way of by Professor Mansel, the Gospel of confuting it is to apply a true and St. John by the Dean of Canterbury, legitimate one. The honour of and the Acts by Dr. Jacobson. The originating the plan is due to the editorship of St. Paul's Epistles is Speaker of the House of Commons, appropriately assigned to Bp. Ellicott who consulted several of the bishops and Dr. Jeremie, with Dr. Gifford, on the subject, and the Archbishop Professor T. Evans, Rev. J. Waite, of York, at his instance, undertook and Professor J. Lightfoot as conto organize a plan for producing a tributors. To the Archbishop elect commentary which should put the of Dublin and the Master of Balliol reader in full possession of whatever is assigned the rest of the sacred information may be requisite to en. canon. This really promises to be able him to understand the Word of a work second only in importance to God, and supply him with satis- the 'LXX.,' or the English version factory answers to objections resting made by the order of King James. upon misrepresentation of its con- Perhaps it will be quoted as the tents.' The plan has received the XXX. The names of the editors sanction of the Primate. A com- and contributors, while they ensure mittee-consisting of the Archbishop orthodoxy, give promise that the of York, the Bishops of London, comment thus put forth almost

with the sanction of the Church of font there is a baptistry provided for England as a body will not be the the immersion of adults by the side utterance of any narrow school or of the font proper. It is approached section of it.

by steps and lined with Goodwin's • WARILY DIPPING.-A Welsh tiles; a large white cross of tiles is newspaper of the 13th inst., gives laid on the floor of the baptistry, an account of the consecration of going the whole length and width of Pontlottyn new church, in the parish it. The baptistry is a new feature of Gelligaer, and the county of in our churches, and has excited Glamorgan; and in a very elaborate much comment in the neighbourdescription of the beautiful edifice, hood, where the Baptist body are we have the following :-Under the I very numerous.'

Elotes of the Month.

ECCLESIASTICAL.

with such weapons, they would only PALMERSTON has been most aptly

swell their ranks.- The English styled 'the bishop maker.' Ten

church is getting ashamed of its English bishops, five Irish, eight attempt to 'silence' Colenso by deans, and four archbishops owe

authority ; ' and is now going to do their appointments to the unclerical what she sbould have done at firstpremier. Our rumour as to the answer him. Many eminent scholars archbishopric of Dublin turns out havegiven in their names to a scheme to be correct. Dean Trench is the which, popularizing the ripest successor of archbishop Whately. I learning of the day, shall be an Canon Stanley succeeds to the authorized defence of the Old and deanery of Westminister – 'the New Testament Scriptures. This snuggest thing,' says a church is good, as far as it goes. But all organ, 'in the English church ! the scholarship does not happen to How oddly it would sound to read a be found within the pale of the similar description of the election Establishment, and in a work of of Epaphroditus as the minister of this kind it would have been gracethe apostolic church at Philippi! ful and wise to say the least, to The bishop of Oxford has made a recognize and profit thereby.—The marvellous discovery for so acute a church organs have been chuckling man, and announced it, with ap- over what they are pleased to call propriate wailing, in his recent the restoration to the church of a triennial charge. It is this—that popular Baptist minister.' The the three hindrances of the clergy recalcitrant dissenter, it appears, are, bad cottages, beer houses, and however, is a Mr. Bailey, one of dissent! • The presence,' says Dr. the students of Spurgeon's college, Wilberforce, of separatists in the who has recently been settled over parishes weakens the efforts of the an obscure Baptist chapel in Hull. clergy, and disturbs the minds of His ‘recantation' does not give much the flock. What we want is more dis- evidence of principle. We wish tinctive church teaching !' Exactly. the Church joy of their gain. The But instead of defeating dissenters I dissenters have lost nothing. The

Notes of the Month-General.

465 Baptists of East Lancashire have murderer public curiosity was exlately held an important meeting at cited to an unusual degree. The Accrington, which was very numer. murderer has been tracked outously attended. Its purpose was to but, before he was apprehended promote practical union among the had anticipated his certain fate by Baptists in that district. Similar taking poison.- The Crawley courtmeetings in other parts of the martial, now being held at Aldershot, country would be an admirable bids fair to occupy a large share of preparation for what we hope yet to public attention. The gravity of see a united Baptist Congregational the charges against the prisoner, Union. Such a body might be held his high station, the distance of the for common purposes, without any scene of the supposed crime, the destruction of existing organizations, number of witnesses which have and would put the strength of the been summoned from India—to say Baptist body more fairly before the nothing of the vast expence which the British public.-Our brethren in whole proceedings will necessarily Courland are still suffering from involve-give the affair unusual imthe intolerance and bigotry of the portance. The municipal elections Russian clergy backed by the are over. A good average of disgovernment officials. Some are now senters again occupy the honourable in prison for conscience' sake, and position of mayor. The annual a virtual prohibition of all meetings banquet to the ministers at the among Baptists for religious worship Mansion House led to the annual exists. Their condition is every display of a style of eloquence inwhit as much deserving of the dispensable to official life—the power sympathy and help of the Evangeli. of saying with vigour and tact. what cal Alliance as the condition of the everybody knows without in the now liberated Spanish prisoners.- least saying what everybody wants Mr. Landels, after mature deliber- to know. There was no word about ation, has decided not to go to the Congress, about Japan, or about Australia.—The celebrated Scotch the steam rams at Liverpool. In preacher, Dr. Guthrie, we exceed reference to the destruction of ingly regret to hear is ill, and fears Kagosima Mr. Cobden has spoken are expressed that the end of his sharply in a recent letter to the public life is at hand. He is old, mayor of Rochdale. We learnt also and needs rest.

that this affair will form the subject

of a searching enquiry at the next GENERAL

session. Meanwhile we beg to call

the special attention of our readers The shocking murders in a London to a letter from an esteemed brother cab of a woman and her two children which will be found in another part by her husband has created a pro- of the present Magazine. — The found impression throughout the French oracle has spoken. Europe country. During the interval which waited with uneasy suspense for elapsed between the commission of the Emperor's speech. His idea of the crime and the detection of the righting every political difficulty by a Congress has not the merit of | A poor woman, enciente, has recently being original. The members of been whipt unmercifully. Her the Peace Society were loud in their offence was ridiculous: — being advocacy of a similar plan a dozen found, contrary to law, in the years ago. The emperor, however streets after dark without a lantern. small may be the ch ces of any She was walking home one night such Congress, which the Times in through the streets of Warsaw with a grandiloquent mood describes as her husband. They met a friend. She an Amphictyonic Council has passed on while the two chatted gained two things by his proposal, together, and, having no lantern, -a new toy for the French people to was suddenly pounced upon by a play with, and time. The empress soldier, carried to the guard-house, Eugenie, it is said on good authority, notwithstanding the protestations of is a most devout Catholic, and by her husband, and was then most her predilections and whims gives barbarously whipt.—The new king her imperial husband no small of Greece has reached Athens. His trouble. He hates the priests : she frankness and suavity have won him sides with them. He would with much favour. He'frames' well, and draw his troops from Rome if he may yet lift the Greeks to an dare, and writes sharp notes to the honourable position among the Pope. She sells her jewels, and nations.-America still drags on collects money intended for other her fratricidal war. At the present purposes,—and sends the result to moment the Federals have gained Pius the Ninth. The empress is some few advantages. But the already fading, and her once peerless termination of the war, which Mr. beauty has to be dressed like a Secretary Seward has prophesied damaged wax bust in a hairdresser's any time these two years was about window. -- The inhumanities in to end speedily, is apparently no Poland grow daily more revolting. I nearer its termination.

Marriages and Deaths. .

MARRIAGE.

many years was an esteemed member

of the General Baptist church at November 4, at the General Bap. Leake and Wymeswold. tist chapel, Burnley-lane, by Rev.

October 7, at Costock, Notting0. Hargreaves, Mr. J. Dean, con hamshire, aged 61 years, Mr. Henry tractor, to Mrs. Jane Robertshaw, Follows, deeply regretted by a wide widow of the late Rev. W. Robert. circle of friends. shaw.

November 10, at Quorndon, aged DEATHS.

75 years, Richard Cross, Esq.,

formerly of Thorpe-in-the-Glebes, August1, at Thorpe-in-the-Glebes, who for many years was a valuable Leicestershire, in the 81st year of deacon of the General Baptist his age, Mr. Thomas Miller, who for church at Leake and Womeswold.

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