Style: Language Variation and Identity

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 9, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 224 pages
Style refers to ways of speaking - how speakers use the resource of language variation to make meaning in social encounters. This 2007 book develops a coherent theoretical approach to style in sociolinguistics, illustrated with copious examples. It explains how speakers project different social identities and create different social relationships through their style choices, and how speech-style and social context inter-relate. Style therefore refers to the wide range of strategic actions and performances that speakers engage in, to construct themselves and their social lives. Coupland draws on and integrates a wide variety of contemporary sociolinguistic research as well as his own extensive research in this field. The emphasis is on how social meanings are made locally, in specific relationships, genres, groups and cultures, and on studying language variation as part of the analysis of spoken discourse.

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About the author (2007)

Nikolas Coupland is Professor and Research Director of the Cardiff University Centre for Language and Communication Research. He is a founding co-editor of the Journal of Sociolinguistics.

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