A hand-book for travellers on the continent. [1st] [2 issues of the 16th and 17th eds. The 18th ed. is in 2 pt. Pt.1 only of the 19th ed.].

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Page 164 - And Ardennes waves above them her green leaves, Dewy with Nature's tear-drops, as they pass, Grieving, if aught inanimate e'er grieves, Over the unreturning brave, — alas ! Ere evening to be trodden like the grass, Which, now beneath them, but above shall grow In its next verdure, when this fiery mass Of living valour, rolling on the foe, And burning with high hope, shall moulder cold and low.
Page xi - TRAVEL, in the younger sort, is a part of education ; in the elder, a part of experience. He that travelleth into a country, before he hath some entrance into the language, goeth to school, and not to travel.
Page xi - ... wherein so much is to be observed, for the most part they omit it ; as if chance were fitter to be registered than observation : let diaries, therefore, be brought in use. The things to be seen and observed are, the courts of princes, especially when they give audience to ambassadors...
Page 286 - So then to his palace returned he, And he sat down to supper merrily, And he slept that night like an innocent man ; But Bishop Hatto never slept again. In the morning as he...
Page 286 - I'll go to my tower on the Rhine," replied he; "Tis the safest place in Germany; The walls are high, and the shores are steep And the stream is strong, and the water deep.
Page 256 - Adieu to thee, fair Rhine ! How long delighted The stranger fain would linger on his way ! Thine is a scene alike where souls united Or lonely Contemplation thus might stray; And could the ceaseless vultures cease to prey On self-condemning bosoms, it were here, Where Nature, nor too sombre nor too gay, Wild but not rude, awful yet not austere, Is to the mellow Earth as Autumn to the year.
Page 256 - Banners on high, and battles passed below ; But they who fought are in a bloody shroud, And those which waved are shredless dust ere now, And the bleak battlements shall bear no future blow.
Page 270 - Brief, brave, and glorious was his young career, — His mourners were two hosts, his friends and foes ; And fitly may the stranger lingering here Pray for his gallant spirit's bright repose ; For he was Freedom's champion, one of those, The few in number, who had not o'erstept 550 The charter to chastise which she bestows On such as wield her weapons ; he had kept The whiteness of his soul, and thus men o'er him wept.
Page 264 - And peasant girls, with deep blue eyes, And hands which offer early flowers, Walk smiling o'er this paradise; Above, the frequent feudal towers Through green leaves lift their walls of gray, And many a rock which steeply lowers, And noble arch in proud decay, Look o'er this vale of vintage bowers; But one thing want these banks of Rhine, — Thy gentle hand to clasp in mine!
Page 270 - By Coblentz, on a rise of gentle ground. There is a small and simple pyramid, Crowning the summit of the verdant mound; Beneath its base are heroes' ashes hid, Our enemy's, — but let not that forbid Honor to Marceau!

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