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" It is this sense which furnishes the imagination with its ideas ; so that by the pleasures of the imagination, or fancy, (which I shall use promiscuously,) I here mean such as arise from visible objects, either when we have them actually in our view,... "
Select British Classics - Page 70
1803
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1729
...of the Imagination or Fancy (which I mail ufe promifcuoufly) I here mean luch as arife from vifible Objects, either when we have them actually in our View, or when we c.'.ll up their Ideas in our Minds by Paintings, Statues, Defcriptions, or any the like Occafion. We...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1739
...1 here mean fuch aa arifc from vifiblc Objects, eitlicr when we have them actually in our View, 0r when we call up their Ideas into our Minds by Paintings, Statues, Defmptioiu, or any the like Occafion. We uumot indeed Imvc u finglc Image in the Fancy that did not...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

English essays - 1767
...ufe promifcuoufly) I here mean fuch as aiife from vifible objctls, either when we have them aftually in our view, or when we call up their ideas into our minds by paintings, ttatues, defcriptions, or any the like occafion We cannot indeed have a fingle image in the fancy that...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1778
...of the imagination or fancy (which I fhall ufe promifcuoufly) I here mean fueh as arife from vifible objects, either when we have them actually in our...we call up their ideas into our minds by paintings, ftatues, defcnptions, or any the like occafion. We cannot indeed have a fingle image in the fancy that...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - English language - 1793
...mifcuoully), I here mean fuch as ariie from " vifiblc objefts, either when we have them ac" tually in our view ; or when we call up their " ideas into our minds by paintings, flatuesr. de" fcriptions, or any the like occafion." In place of, " It is this fenfe which furnifiies"...
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A Rhetorical Grammar: In which the Common Improprieties in Reading and ...

John Walker - Elocution - 1801 - 392 pages
...little encourage me in the prosecution of this my undertaking. Sped. N 124. It is this sense which furnishes the imagination with its ideas ; so that...promiscuously) I here mean such as arise from visible objects. Ibid. N 411. We sometimes meet, in books very respectably printed, with the parenthesis marked where...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - English language - 1802
...Imagination or Fancy, " (which I fhall ufe promifcuoufly) I here mean fuch as arife, ** from vifible objecls, either when we have them actually in '* our view ;...call up their ideas into our minds *' by paintings, ftatues, defcriptions, or any the like occafion." In place of, It is this fenfe which furnijhes, the...
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The works of ... Joseph Addison, collected by mr. Tickell, Volume 2

Joseph Addison - 1804
...figures, and brings into our' reach some of the most remote parts of the universe It is this sense which furnishes the imagination with its ideas; so that...or when, we call up their ideas into our minds by painting, statues, descriptions, or any the like occasion. We cannot indeed have a single image in...
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Selections from the Spectator, Tatler, Guardian, and Freeholder: Selections ...

English essays - 1804
...figures, and brings into our reach some of the most remote parts of the umverse. It is this sense which furnishes the imagination with its ideas; so that...promiscuously) I here mean such as arise from visible objects, cither when we have them them actually in our view, or when we call up therr ideas into our minds by...
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English Grammar: Adapted to the Different Classes of Learners : with an ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1805 - 336 pages
...this former services;" it should have been, "greatly increased the merit of his former services." " By the pleasures of the imagination or fancy (which I shall use promiscuously) I here mean," &c. This passage ought to have had the word " terms" supplied, which, would have made it correct: "...
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