The Bibliographer: A Journal of Book-lore ..., Volumes 3-4

Front Cover
E. Stock, 1883 - Bibliography
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 169 - Edition. A Million of Facts of Correct Data and Elementary Information in the Entire Circle of the Sciences, and on all Subjects of Speculation and Practice.
Page 31 - Set me as a seal upon thine heart, as a seal upon thine arm : for love is strong as death ; jealousy is cruel as the grave : the coals thereof are coals of fire, which hath a most vehement flame...
Page 155 - ... The whole made up two pages of moderate size. Whatever was communicated respecting matters of the highest moment was communicated in the most meagre and formal style. Sometimes, indeed, when the government was disposed to gratify the public curiosity respecting an important transaction, a broadside was put forth giving fuller details than could be found in the Gazette : but neither the Gazette nor any supplementary broadside printed by authority ever contained any intelligence which it did not...
Page 154 - The Poetical Decameron, or ten Conversations on English Poets and Poetry, particularly of the Reigns of Elizabeth and James I.
Page 5 - Brescia, who lived at the end of the fifteenth and beginning of the sixteenth century, and died 1510, at Bergamo, at a very advanced age.
Page 184 - Give us this day our daily bread ; And as we those forgive Who sin against us, so may we Forgiving grace receive.
Page 155 - The London Gazette came out only on Mondays and Thursdays. The contents generally were a royal proclamation, two or three Tory addresses, notices of two or three promotions, an account of a skirmish between the imperial troops and the Janissaries on the Danube, a description of a highwayman, an announcement of a grand cockfight between two persons of honour, and an advertisement offering a reward for a strayed dog. The whole made up two pages of moderate size.
Page 21 - I ever read with attention. It opened to me a new world of thought and enjoyment; invested things before almost unnoticed with the highest interest ; fixed my mind on the study of nature, and caused me to resolve at the time of reading it that I would immediately commence to devote my life to the acquisition of knowledge.
Page 183 - The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of ? Thus conscience doth make cowards of us all...
Page 23 - That was certainly a matter for rejoicing, but at the same time it must not be forgotten that the...

Bibliographic information